23 Jun

Wales v Ireland – The Preview

first_imgBy Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features EditorWALES v IRELANDSaturday 12 March, 5pm, Millennium Stadium, Referee: Jonathan Kaplan (SA), Live on BBC1Both teams have played three and won two in this year’s RBS 6 Nations. Both teams have won a Grand Slam in the past three years. Both teams have an ongoing debate about who is their best fly-half. But who is going to win tomorrow’s game between Wales and Ireland? Well, here are some pointers about some of the battles set to take place in Cardiff…THE PENALTY COUNTMuch has been made about the number of penalties Ireland have given away so far in this championship – in fact, Warren Gatland is going to talk to the referee about it before the game after no Irishman was sent to the sin-bin in Scotland despite repeat offensives at the breakdown – but it’s Wales who have conceded more penalties in the three games to date, 36 to Ireland’s 34. Both sides will need to significantly reduce their infringements, particularly in their own half which has been a trait of Ireland’s this year, or they will be punished by the boots of the opposition kicker.THE BACK ROWRyan Jones is back to something like his best form at No 8 for Wales and will be keen to maintain that level of performance as he wins his 50th cap. He seems to be enjoying his role as the senior statesman in the back row alongside young guns Sam Warburton and Dan Lydiate, who have both impressed with their work-rate and get better with every game. They will face a stern test from the hard-running Irish trio, who are all strong ball-carriers. However, Sean O’Brien does have a tendency to lose the ball in contact and Warburton could make his presence felt at the breakdown more than his opponents. THE FLY-HALVESIreland have opted for the consistency and territorial kicking game of Ronan O’Gara while Wales have gone for the flair of James Hook, so it’s a real contrast of styles.Risky business: James HookMr Conservative: Ronan O’GaraHook was undoubtedly a key man against Scotland but Gordon D’Arcy and Brian O’Driscoll will target him mercilessly in Cardiff to see if he flounders – can he still work his magic under intense pressure? Can he control the game and clear the danger with a kick as well as exploiting space? These are questions he must answer in the positive if Wales are to have a chance, otherwise O’Gara will be given the possession he needs to keep Wales pinned deep in their own half.THE BACK THREEBoth teams have dangerous runners who given time and space can counter-attack with the best of them. Lee Byrne is rediscovering his best form for Wales and with Leigh Halfpenny back in the side and Shane Williams on the other wing, Wales could cause Ireland lots of problems if they put in poor kicks. The two wingers can dart through the tiniest of gaps to create scoring chances and will be looking to do so here. Ireland’s back three is strong too and Tommy Bowe will want to get one over his Ospreys team-mates, while Luke Fitzgerald is settling into the full-back role and Keith Earls has plenty of gas – but they will need to perform better than they did in this challenge.WALES: Lee Byrne; Leigh Halfpenny, Jamie Roberts, Jonathan Davies, Shane Williams; James Hook, Mike Phillips; Paul James, Matthew Rees (capt), Craig Mitchell, Bradley Davies, Alun Wyn Jones, Dan Lydiate, Sam Warburton, Ryan Jones. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Replacements: Richard Hibbard, John Yapp, Jonathan Thomas, Rob McCusker, Dwayne Peel, Stephen Jones, Morgan StoddartIRELAND: Luke Fitzgerald; Tommy Bowe, Brian O’Driscoll (capt), Gordon D’Arcy, Keith Earls; Ronan O’Gara, Eoin Reddan; Cian Healy, Rory Best, Mike Ross, Donncha O’Callaghan, Paul O’Connell, Sean O’Brien, David Wallace, Jamie Heaslip. Replacements: Sean Cronin, Tom Court, Leo Cullen, Denis Leamy, Peter Stringer, Jonathan Sexton, Paddy Wallace.last_img read more

23 Jun

Rugby Championship: History points to Ellis Park powder keg

first_imgIt is no wonder Graham Henry set about changing the culture of the All Black after this defeat…If you want to know the last time New Zealand won at Ellis against South Africa, though, you have to go all the way back to 1997 when the visitors just pipped the Boks to a 35 – 32 victory.The freedom of Ellis: Will Jean de Villiers celebrate again?Two tries from Frank Bunce and one each for Jeff Wilson and Carlos Spencer gave them an advantage over the two-try Springboks, who dotted down with Naka Drotske and Russell Bennett, but they only just made it in the end as a last-play kick from Jannie de Beer that would have rendered the game a draw hit the post. JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA – JUNE 16: Jean de Plessis, the South African captain acknowledges the applause of the crowd after their victory during the second test match between South Africa and England at Ellis Park on June 16, 2012 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Getting carried away: The first RC Test between the Boks and the Blacks was hard-fought so hold on to your hats…By Alan DymockTHE LAST match between New Zealand and South Africa in the Rugby Championship may have been as contentious as an infant in it’s first hour of learning the word “no”, but history tells us that the second and final Test of this season’s tournament in Johannesburg should be a ripsnorter.Two rounds ago the All Blacks took a bonus-point win over the Boks at Eden Park, 29 – 15, in a game marred by a controversial red card for visiting hooker Bismarck du Plessis and second-half yellows for All Blacks Kieran Read and Ma’a Nonu. In the end, though, the Kiwis’ four tries – two from Read – were enough to see off the hosts.Hat-trick hero: Marius Joubert slips past Tana UmagaHowever, with South Africa yearning to prove a point and the All Blacks still wary of the bruising Boks, anything can still happen. Particularly at Ellis Park.The last time the two sides met at Ellis it was 2004 and the Springboks trampled their way to a 40 – 26 victory. A hat-trick of tries for centre Marius Joubert was added to by Breyton Paulse and Jean de Villiers, while the All Blacks could only muster scores from Mils Muliaina and Joe Rokocoko. It was a slugfest, but while Andrew Mehrtens tried his damndest to kick New Zeland further ahead the dead-eyed Percy Montgomery was there keeping pace with him.The game was noteworthy for the fact that Muliaina pumped New Zealand to a 10-point lead and Welsh referee Nigel Williams had to hobble off the park after 15 minutes, but the main talking point of the match was the muscle of the hosts.  Built on the work of Os du Randt, John Smit, Bakkies Botha, Victor Matfield, Schalk Burger, Joe van Niekerk, the lesser-known warrior Gerrie Britz and the mastermind Joost van der Westhuizen there was no chance for New Zealand. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Will the game on Saturday be as tight as those at Ellis in the past? Well, whether it is or it isn’t, the Springboks fans are finding solace in that and listening to the noises coming from South Africa chief Heyneke Meyer they will not be happy unless they have thrown everything at New Zealand.The ultimate game of the 2013 Rugby Championship could be beautifully brutal.last_img read more

23 Jun

Hotshot: Leinster prop Andrew Porter

first_img Date of birth 16 January 1996 Country IrelandTell us about your rugby background… My dad, Ernest, introduced me to rugby at five. He played for Old Wesley and was my coach there. I stayed with Old Wesley until I started secondary school at St Andrew’s College. It’s not much of a rugby school but our team did quite well.Did you play other sports? Yes, but I had my heart set on rugby from the get-go.When did you link up with Leinster? Not until the U20s. I started at UCD and joined the Leinster sub-academy and then went up to the full academy.When did you first play for Ireland? I played Ireland U18 Schools, then two years at U20.Do you have good memories of last year’s U20 World Championship? TAGS: Leinster LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS RW Verdict: Porter is out of the U20 age grade now and is making his mark with Leinster. An economics student at UCD, he has brains as well as brawn and will go far.This article first appeared in the April 2017 issue of Rugby World. For the latest subscription offers, click here. Learn more about Andrew Porter – an Irish front-rower being tipped for big things Definitely. We were the first Irish team to get to the final and, without taking away from the seniors, the first male Ireland team to beat New Zealand!You made the tournament’s Dream Team at the end… It’s great to be recognised on a world stage.Who was a big influence? My dad and my strength and conditioning coach at St Andrew’s, David Jones.What are your aims this season? It was to get my first cap for Leinster in the Pro12 and that was a surprise when I got it early. The big thing is to keep pushing for starts, to get more experience. The Six Nations (when others are away) is hopefully a good opportunity to show my ability. Handiwork: Andrew Porter shows his handling skills in Leinster training. Photo: Getty Images last_img read more

23 Jun

Wales v France Talking Points From Cardiff

first_imgWales – Tries: L Williams. Pens: Halfpenny 3.France – Tries: Fickou. Cons: Machenaud 2. DG: Trinh-Duc. Telling try: Wales wing Liam Williams scores the only try for the hosts Wales have finished second in the Six Nations after claiming a wobbly but vital 14-13 win over France at the Principality Stadium.Both sides played with a sense of tempo, but without any kind of clinical edge. This had more of an end-of-camp kick-around feel to it, with only league positions under Ireland up for grabs. France allowed Wales to win as they played a lot of rugby without capitalising, but Wales must be thrilled they crawled over the line. They finished fifth last year, and climbed three places this time.Alun Wyn Jones and Taulupe Faletau threw their bodies at the scrappy affair and it was only secured in the last play, as Aaron Shingler stole a final French lineout when the visitors tried in vain to snatch a win at the death.And so ends Six Nations 2018.Winging in: Gael Fickou scampers through for a French scoreThis was a tense and error-strewn number that just happened to follow on the heals of the impressive Irish festivities at Twickenham. It could have given us a little sting in the tail if France had won, but they ended up being their own worst enemies.Related: Ireland win the Grand SlamWe got the full Francois Trinh-Duc here. He slotted a drop-goal calmly at the start of the match, but straight from the restart Wales reclaimed the ball, worked it wide and a Scott Williams grubber bounced right over Trinh-Duc’s head. Liam Williams couldn’t fail to score. In the second half, the ten would miss a sitter of a penalty that would have given France the lead.Fickou finished off a try he created himself, beginning out wide and tracking play in-field. Worked back to him, he scampered through a gaping hole for his side’s only try. They could have built so much more, but scrums near the Welsh line crumbled in the second half. Both teams ran shuttles between he try-lines, like a basketball match with no buckets dunked.Wales would spill vital offloads and French runners would be swallowed up – even big skipper Mathieu Bastareaud. The French could have really shown that they have turned a corner here, but there was no Cardiac Kids, no come-from-behind win. Wales clung on.So here’s what you will be talking about after this game…Stopped at source: Maxime Machenaud is tied upBy the skin of their teethWales claimed their win thanks largely to the fact France could not convert their opportunities, from the tee or with ball in hand.So much play was bogged down in the midfield, but when France had chances – as with Remy Grosso getting a one-on-one with George North at the end – he was duly introduced, via the foot, to the touchline. Not that Wales offered anything better. One try is no great return. But it is a result. One that means they are the runner’s-up in the Six Nations. Oh, and also one that pushes England down to fifth place in the final standings.Nothing to write home aboutThere was adventure and tempo with France at the start. But they could not make a whopping advantage in possession count as the contest wore on. It was when they got in space and had to feed their strike runners that there was a holding of breath – and not their nerve. Eventually all the rebuilding of this French side will have to stop and more than a few good results will need to follow.Of course when head coach Warren Gatland said earlier in the month that his side were targeting second place in the Championship, it was paid little notice. But even though many will forget this tie in a flash, the experience for players like Josh Navidi, Cory Hill and Hadleigh Parkes in collecting important wins in a red jersey could well be viewed as another little bonus.Playing his part: One of many hits by Alun Wyn JonesAlun Wyn Jones His was a captain’s knock in a physical game that could have gone either way. He was Man of the Match here and there’s no reason to argue. And as a reward, he will be allowed to rest this summer. No tour for him in June.Fickou winging itThe Toulouse centre was selected at wing – his first time as a wide-out for France, and somewhere where he hasn’t featured for his club in a few years.It showed defensively. Early on the Welsh spotted that his positioning was off, so laced kicks behind him when he was in no man’s land.However, he is an instinctive attacker, and strolled through an enormous hole to take a first-half try. No one doubts his front-foot prowess. But he had kicks aimed his way constantly and in the end, that try by Wales was a key difference-maker. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

23 Jun

The day Namibia suffer a record defeat in the Rugby World Cup

first_img A cricket score: Namibia attempt to keep the Wallabies out in 2003 (Getty Images) “The main talk was that we needed to slow it down and keep possession. For that whole game there was maybe five minutes where we managed to keep the ball, but you must remember they had guys like George Smith. Our ball security wasn’t good enough, we weren’t strong enough.“Weather-wise it was a perfect day. The weekend before we played Ireland in Sydney and it was raining. Ireland were a really good team as well and 
I’d say if it hadn’t rained, we probably would have had a very similar result. 
We kept the score more respectable (64-7). It was a big hiding, but the rain maybe meant they played more conservative. In Adelaide, you couldn’t complain about the weather at all.”Lensing admits that he never imagined in his darkest nightmares that another international side would put 100 points on them. When the Wallabies ticked past the ton, his thoughts turned to Japan’s loss to the All Blacks in 1995, when the Kiwis won 145-17. He hoped they wouldn’t lose that badly.But their deficit was to be bigger.Splashdown: Lensing takes a moment against Australia (AFP/Getty Images)Lensing, who was 25 at the time, is proud of how he kept battling on, but he admits that some veterans were already ‘at the bar’ when the Australians started really cutting loose. He understands that this was some lingering amateurism. By the next World Cup in 2007, there was a management clearout, a new approach and more World Rugby investment.Jump to Japan this year and Lensing 
is full of hope that Namibia can claim 
a first-ever World Cup win. The realist 
in him admits it will be tough and that Canada, who he feels the team should target, are still a very good side. But against every team, even the All Blacks and the Springboks, the team will tear themselves apart from the cause.“It’s a Namibian culture thing: we will go flat out,” he explains. “Think 
of 2011 when Chrysander Botha tackled the Beast (Tendai Mtawarira) from the front. That never should have happened, he is maybe 80kg and the Beast is about 120kg, but he decided ‘You’re not going to run over me’. The kid put his body on the line. That kind of commitment you are 
going to get from all the Namibians.”Who cares how hard the scoreboard operators work with heart like that. This feature first appeared in the September issue of Rugby World.Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, and Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Namibian Kees Lensing recalls a the 142-0 loss to Australia in 2003. From the September issue of Rugby World.center_img IT’S STARTLING what little things you can take away from 
a hefty loss. Some clam up. Some seethe. Some scheme. But after representing Namibia on the wrong side of a record defeat in the Rugby World Cup, losing 142-0 to the Wallabies in Adelaide in 2003, Kees Lensing learnt to turn the radio off.“To this day, if I hear Thunderstruck 
by AC/DC, I hate it,” says the former loosehead, who will be head coach of Seattle Seawolves in Major League Rugby next season. “It’s nothing against the band, but that was the last song the boys played as we got off the bus for that game. Every time I hear the song now 
I think ‘s***!’ A lot of kids think ‘Oh, that song will get me up and going’ but for me it has a totally different meaning.”To this day he will only open up about the record result if someone asks for his thoughts, saying: “I’m not going to go to a barbecue and start talking about it.” He remembers much of the game against Australia vividly but understandably tries not to relive what was a brutal experience.Even now, building towards the 2019 World Cup in Japan, Namibia are one of the most under-resourced sides in the showcase. They have been at every World Cup since 1999 but have always had logistical battles, financial fights 
and a lack of elite avenues for their 
best home-based players.Dejected: Namibia under the sticks again (AFP/Getty Images)Lensing explains the situation in 2003. “World Rugby, which was the IRB back then, put on one of the best-organised tournaments ever. It was amazing. So those parts – the buses, the food, the hotels and stadiums – were really good, well organised. But Namibia had really bad-quality jerseys. For one game we didn’t have any shorts to play in.“Adrian ‘Moose’ Skeggs, who used to play for the Reds, got involved with us. He somehow got us some Canterbury shorts. But they weren’t a Namibian sponsor, so we couldn’t play with them with the logo on them. So we got into the changing room, they gave us these new shorts and some permanent markers. They said, ‘You can play with these shorts but you must colour in the Canterbury sign, otherwise Namibia 
are going to get a massive fine.’“Literally ten, 15 minutes before we went out on the field, everyone was sitting there with a permanent marker and colouring in the Canterbury sign. Otherwise we didn’t have shorts.”Sartorial issues aside, what happened to you on that fateful day in Adelaide?Lensing muses. “We would kick off, they maul us up to the halfway and then pass the ball to one of Lote Tuqiri, Chris Latham, Mat Rogers – he was electric – or Stirling Mortlock. Hey, the whole team was legends.Power play: David Lyons carries hard (AFP/Getty Images)“I remember going into the changing room at half-time – the score was 69-0 – and we had to walk to the left of the pavilion. I was thinking, ‘We’re in big trouble’. Because the first half was when we were fresh and had our better players on. The second half was when they would open the taps. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

23 Jun

Billy Searle raring to get back into Premiership action

first_img Gathering momentum: Billy Searle taking on Leinster last season (Getty Images) More information at www.wowhydrate.comFinally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The young Wasps fly-half was not only helped by team-mates, but with WOW HYDRATE too. This is an advertising feature. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img BEING OUT with injury can be a tough and often lonely place. So it helps to have friends to lean on, as Billy Searle has discovered on his road to recovery.Following a shocking ankle injury, he has been working hard behind the scenes with Wasps team-mates Dan Robson and Jack Willis, grinding with the coaches and physios and using WOW HYDRATE’s products to get back on his feet.The young fly-half had burst into the team and made his mark, but just as he was building momentum last term, disaster struck. As he explains: “It was a terrible time for me to get injured.“I had confidence going into the game against my old team away at Bristol. It was a Friday night and a lot of family and friends came to watch so I was absolutely gutted. The game was going really well until the start of the second half when the incident happened.“The injury was pretty horrific, I looked down at my ankle and it was at a right angle, I had dislocated my ankle and fractured my fibia, the pain was horrendous, it was pure agony and that’s all I really remember.”The ten was in a cast for five weeks. He lost 7kg and when he was finally cast-free, he discovered his calf was “completely dead” – he had to build his leg up again.He became the first in to training and the last to leave. He was working with strength and conditioning coaches, working intensely with physio David Breen, and leaving no stone unturned.WOW HYDRATE became part of his comeback campaign.“WOW HYDRATE have been a massive support for me during my injury and their products have helped me throughout my recovery,” Searle says.“The Collagen Protein in their drinks has helped me strengthen my joints and ligaments and stimulate my muscle growth which has been important in building up my damaged leg.“Their electrolyte drink which has a push cap that contains vitamins has also had equal importance in my recovery as the nutrients in the drink have helped repair my body tissues, treat inflammation and regulate my sleep throughout my healing process.” So what is it like being locked away, doing rehab and working your way back to on-pitch training?“It’s hard to adapt during a long injury lay-off. There is lots of time to think about things and it can be quite lonely but I’m a positive person, you have good days and bad days. I’ve been lucky to have the support of Dan Robson and Jack Willis throughout my rehab as they have both suffered injuries. We’ve been pushing each other and it has been good to share the ups and downs with the lads during our recovery together.“I had lots of support from people in the game which was great. Danny Cipriani messaged me which was a huge boost to me as he had suffered a similar injury.“I have resumed training this week after being sidelined for seven months, I’m feeling fit and strong after my rehabilitation and my ankle is strong. Hopefully I can get back playing very soon and break into the team again.”That must come as music to the ears of any passionate Wasps fan.The sugar free electrolyte water and protein water has a unique push-cap technology which releases fresh ingredients into its water and is stocked in Tesco, Morrisons, Whole Foods and online at Amazon and Ocado. last_img read more

23 Jun

Canada Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide

first_img Namibia booked their place once again at the… Expand Canada Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, GuideThe very last team to make it into the 2019 Rugby World Cup, Canada have managed to continue their record of making every edition of the tournament. They lost all four matches in 2015 and this time lost their opening three pool games before their final match against Namibia was cancelled due to Typhoon Hagibis.How They QualifiedCanada secured their spot in the World Cup by winning the repechage tournament over Hong Kong, Kenya and Germany.Key PlayersThere are some experienced players in the ranks of the current Canadian squad. From a forwards standpoint, Waikato Chief Tyler Ardron is arguably the most talented of the bunch, whereas in the back-line Glasgow Warrior DTH Van der Merwe is a threat.Warrior: DTH Van Der Merwe plies his trade for Glasgow (Getty Images)The Coach – Kingsley JonesFormer Wales flanker Jones took over from Mark Anscombe in 2017 and has had a less than ideal reign so far. He has also coached Russia, Sale and Newport Gwent Dragons.Major Work-onsThe defensive efforts required against the likes of New Zealand and South Africa are likely to sap them of energy and lead to them falling apart later in games.Canada Rugby World Cup Warm-upsSaturday 27 July 2019: USA 47-19 CanadaSaturday 3 August 2019: Fiji 38-13 CanadaFriday 9 August 2019: Tonga 33-23 CanadaSaturday 24 August 2019: Canada 35-38 LeinsterFriday 30 August: Canada 45-13 BC All-StarsSaturday 7 September: Canada 15-20 USARelated: 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-upsCanada Rugby World Cup GroupCanada are in Group B alongside New Zealand, South Africa, Italy, and Namibia.Related: 2019 Rugby World Cup Groups South Africa Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide The last team to qualify for the tournament, Canada had to go through the repechage tournament to book their place in Japan Italy Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Expand Deja Vu: Canada, playing in 2015 against Italy, will once again face them at the 2019 World Cup (Getty Images)Canada Rugby World Cup SquadKingsley Jones has named his final 31-man squad;Forwards (17):Tyler ArdronKyle BaillieJosh LarsenHubert BuydensLuke CampbellMatt HeatonEric HowardJake IlnickiCole KeithConor KeysEvan OlmsteadBenoit PifferoAndrew QuattrinLucas RumballDjustice Sears-DuruMike SheppardMatthew TierneyBacks (14):Nick Blevins (replaced by Guiseppe Du Toit)Andrew CoeJeff HasslerCiaran HearnBen LeSage (replaced by Theo Sauder)Phil MackJamie MackenzieGordon McRoriePeter NelsonShane O’LearyPatrick ParfreyTaylor ParisConor TrainorDTH van der Merwe.Related: 2019 Rugby World Cup FixturesPrevious World Cup Results and RecordCanada’s Rugby World Cup Record: P33 W7 D3 L231987 Pool stages1991 Quarter-finals1995 Pool stages1999 Pool stages2003 Pool stages2007 Pool stages2011 Pool stages2015 Pool stages2019 Pool stagesFollow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Winners of the past two World Cups, the… Italy Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Namibia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guidecenter_img Collapse Canada Rugby World Cup FixturesThu 26 Sept Italy 48-7 Canada (Fukuoka) Match reportWed 2 Oct New Zealand 63-0 Canada (Oita) Match ReportTue 8 Oct South Africa 66-7 Canada (Kobe) Match ReportSun 13 Oct Namibia 0-0 Canada (Kamaishi) Match cancelled – click here for details Four years on from their shock loss to… South Africa Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide In a tough group, Italy were denied chance… New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Namibia Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide TAGS: Canada Expand Canada Rugby World Cup Kit Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

20 Jun

Episcopal Church, Virginia prevail as court refuses to revise decision

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] Seven breakaway congregations have been ordered by a judge to return control of church property to the Diocese of Virginia by April 30.Fairfax County Circuit Court Judge Randy I. Bellows set that date after he refused March 1 to reconsider, as requested by the congregations, the part of his Jan. 10 opinion in which he said that some personal property, including monetary gifts, given to the congregations prior to January 31, 2007, belongs to the diocese.Bellows’ actions were meant to implement his Jan. 10 opinion that the diocese and the Episcopal Church “have a contractual and proprietary interest in the property of these Episcopal churches” for use in the church’s mission and ministry. He added that while congregations “had an absolute right to depart from [the Episcopal Church] and the diocese, they had no right to take these seven Episcopal churches with them.”The real property includes seven church buildings and a significant number of other parcels. The personal property includes both tangible items, such as chalices, prayer books and crosses, and intangibles, including the funds on hand, the diocese said in a press release  issued close to midnight on March 1.Bellows ordered that the specific inventory of items be based on what he called the “ownership determination date,” which he set at either Jan. 31, 2007, or Feb. 1, 2007, the dates the diocese formally filed for legal action to recover its property.Bellows issued his order the day after he held a hearing on the issues. The text of the order is here.The ruling allows the CANA congregations to retain some restricted funds over which they have no discretion and that do not benefit the local congregation, the diocese or the Episcopal Church, according to the release. The parties have until March 30 to determine the disposition of that money. Where the parties do not agree, the court will decide.The majority of members and clergy of the seven parishes left to form congregations of the Convocation of Anglicans in North America (CANA), which the Anglican Province of Nigeria began in 2005. The departing members of those congregations then filed claims to parish property under Virginia law.“We hope that this will mark the end of this lengthy litigation,” Virginia Bishop Shannon S. Johnston said in the diocesan release. “By closing this chapter, both the diocese and the CANA congregations have the freedom to focus our energies on the mission and ministries of our respective congregations, and even what we might be able to do together for people and a world in need of the gospel’s work.”Johnston added that the diocese has begun an initiative known as Dayspring, which he said was “an integrated effort to discern and implement a comprehensive vision for our congregations and properties affected by this litigation.”Henry D.W. Burt, secretary of the diocese, called the court’s order “a major milestone in this effort,” and added that the diocese “respect[s] fully the CANA congregations’ right to pursue an appeal, and we are in discussions with them as they face significant issues of discernment and transition in their path forward.”Jim Oakes, spokesperson for the seven congregations, said in a press release that “while our congregations will comply with the final order, we are saddened that the Circuit Court did not accept the motion for partial reconsideration and we continue to believe that, as a matter of religious liberty, it is the right of donors to restrict the use of their own gifts to the church of their choice.”The congregations are “prayerfully considering their legal options,” the release said.“We have always known that a church is not just its buildings, but its people and the transforming gospel of Jesus Christ being proclaimed and lived. We look forward to God leading us in the days ahead,” the Rev. John Yates, rector of the breakaway portion of the Falls Church, said in the same release.Yates had told his congregation on Feb. 22 that “our intention is to move all staff offices to a convenient nearby office building later this spring, and to shift our Sunday worship services to nearby locations” after the deadline set by Bellows. Some of those worship locations have been determined, others have not, he said.Yates also said that the congregation “may very well be led” to change its name from Falls Church Anglican. It has already moved its website to http://www.tfcanglican.org/ from http://www.thefallschurch.org. The Episcopal congregation is located here on the web.Bellow’s Jan. 10 opinion stemmed from a June 2010 decision of the Virginia Supreme Court that found he erred in an earlier ruling when he said that the breakaway congregations involved in the cases were entitled to retain all the parishes’ real and personal property when they left the Episcopal Church and joined another denomination.In June 2010, the Supreme Court held that although disagreements had caused “a division” within the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Virginia, the breakaway congregations had affiliated with a church that was not a branch of either the Episcopal Church or the diocese. Such an affiliation is required, the court said, for Virginia’s one-of-a-kind “Division Statute” (Section 57-9(A)) to apply, as the breakaway congregations claimed.The Supreme Court returned the cases to the lower court for further proceedings to resolve the property claims of the Episcopal Church and the diocese “under principles of real property and contract law.” Bellows held a trial that lasted 22 days stretched over April, May and June 2011, and included testimony by 60 witnesses. He wrote that he also reviewed thousands of pages of post-trial briefs.In coming to his Jan. 10 opinion, Bellows reviewed Virginia statutes governing church property, the deeds to the real property of the churches, the governing rules of the diocese and the Episcopal Church, and the historic relationship between the parishes and the larger church.He concluded state statutes support a finding that a local congregation is obligated to comply with the “laws, rules and ecclesiastical polity” of the denomination with regard to property and that the constitution and canons of both the diocese and the Episcopal Church “demonstrate pervasive dominion, management, and control over local church property, in a manner normally associated with ownership, title, and possession.” Bellows said the deeds in question make clear that the property “cannot be removed from the denomination without the larger church’s consent.”More information about the cases, including all court filings, is available here.The case originally involved members of 11 congregations of the Virginia diocese but the diocese settled with four of the congregations in the intervening years, including Potomac Falls Church in Potomac Falls and Christ the Redeemer Church in Chantilly, neither of which held any real property.The diocese agreed to lease the property of Church of the Word in Prince William County to the breakaway members for five years. The Oatlands congregation announced the purchase of a tract of land where they are building a new church. Church of Our Saviour in Loudon County retained the property after paying the diocese $1.95 million, according to Burt. Both congregations agreed to disaffiliate from CANA for a period of time.The remaining churches are Truro Church, The Church at the Falls – The Falls Church (Arlington), Church of the Apostles (Fairfax), Church of the Epiphany (Fairfax), St. Margaret’s Church (Woodbridge), St. Paul’s Church (Haymarket) and St. Stephen’s Church (Northumberland County).— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. March 6, 2012 at 8:04 pm While not a lawyer, I believe the governing principle has been alluded to by R.A. Garcia, “When the TEC or the PECUSA took over.” Some also suggest the precedent of Crown patents, contacts, and feds were preempted by the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the subsequent precedent set within state and National Conditional law. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC March 3, 2012 at 7:41 pm Regardless of theology, TEC owns the buildings, not the ACNA or any other CANA denomination. It’s one thing to create a different structure on theological tenets; it’s another to illegally commandeer property because of those differences. Let’s say one local bank likes Citi better than PNC, their current hierarchy. Yet, it cannot legally confiscate PNC’s building in order to become a Citi branch. Citi has to build a new building. Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Michael Neal says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Matthew Davies says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books March 4, 2012 at 3:43 pm The Church is not a building. Let them have the buildings. God is purging HIS church, those who believe in the authority of scripture and those who do not. TEC will keep going to the ways of the world, CANA and 80% of the rest of the Anglican Communion will follow Christ. So mote it be……. March 6, 2012 at 8:26 am Dear Chantal, At the top of every article, directly underneath the byline, is a + icon next to the word “Share”. This button enables readers to share our content via an email pop up, through various email clients, or on social media networks. I hope this helps. March 5, 2012 at 1:42 pm WHEN THE TEC or PECUSA TOOK OVER THE ENGLISH CHURCHES IN AMERICA, THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND HAD PROPRIETARY RIGHTS OVER ALL THOSE STRUCTURES, MONIES, RELICS, LANDS et al.? Please do notice, that some of these churches were built prior to the establishment of the USA. John Flynn says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Fred Freeling says: Rector Washington, DC Tony Green says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 2, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis May 4, 2012 at 9:44 am Of the 11 churches that elected to “go to Nigeria”:Two have no real property, so there is no issue.Two settled with the diocese before 2012. One of these left CANA and has accepted the oversight of Bishop Johnston (VA).St Stephen’s, St Margaret’s and Epiphany amicably returned their property to continuing congregations of Episcopalians.Truro reached two-year lease back agreement with the diocese. They conveyed deeds etc to the diocese. The friendship developed between Truro’s rector and Bp. Johnston may lead to a more positive outcome in the future.The Falls Church agreed to return its property to the Episcopal Falls Church. Then they reneged on the agreement. After the April 27 hearing before Judge Bellows, the judge told them to vacate by April 30. The diocese graciously is allowing them until May 15 to return the property.And then there was one — The Church of the Apostles. The Church of the Apostles publishes “prophecies” received by members in their weekly newsletter. These appear to be represented as having the authority of scripture. Their building is actually an industrial facility that is suitable for a Costco or a tire warehouse. There is no continuing congregation.Has the diocese suffered financially from the loss of these congregations? No. These churches haven’t contributed to the diocese in years. Even so they showed up at council meetings and were very vocal in opposing actions desired by Episcopal congregations. No church can grow in the midst of conflict. The Diocese of Virginia has a chance for a new beginning without the drag of schismatics and heretics. I give total credit to Bishop Shannon Johnston for managing this process in gracious pastoral manner. I wish I were as charitable as he is. Property Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tony Green says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID March 6, 2012 at 8:06 pm P.S., contracts and deeds. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Chantal Andrews says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Philip Jones, Reston VA says: Dick Reynolds says: Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL March 21, 2012 at 11:09 pm Undoubtedly they will sell the property to growing congregations of the charismatic persuasion March 3, 2012 at 3:20 pm When our church recovered its property from the CANA group, we struggled. They had left us with a huge mortgage, no vestry or permanent Rector. Here we are five years later growing steadily in faith and numbers, to the point that I believe we now have a larger congregation than the breakaways.It was amazing how many people were willing to take over the tasks of running the parish. The Virginia churches can do no less. Keep the Faith. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 March 3, 2012 at 3:46 pm Hello,This new format of ENS makes it difficult to forward or share articles of particular interest.It was easy to forward to the entire congregation, sending the article to my e-mail address with Bcc to the group. Do you have any suggestions? Thanks.Chantal AndrewsAll Soul’s Episcopal ChurchRidgecrest, CA Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (11) Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ March 3, 2012 at 2:26 pm What will the Episcopal Church do with all those empty buildings? Will they sit as shrines to the will of man? Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church, Virginia prevail as court refuses to revise decision Breakaway congregations given deadline for property return Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service R.A. Garcia says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab James Pirrung says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

20 Jun

Structure Committee calls for task force to recommend ways to…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Structure Committee calls for task force to recommend ways to reform July 9, 2012 at 2:14 pm From what I know of the conversation, I don’t expect that it will end in the intractable morass of existential pondering, but rather in the Great Commission to proclaim the gospel, particularly to emerging generations and those who no longer feel (or never did feel) a connection to the body of Christ. I thank God for the Structure Committee and their hard work in developing this resolution. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Comments (4) Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 9, 2012 at 12:48 pm So, it is proposed that the Episcopal Church re-invent itself in three years! As the Articles of Confederation gave way to the U.S. Constitution during a period of passionate debate and earnest apologia, so is our church now poising itself on the cusp of turbulent–perhaps rancorous– discussion. We must be prepared for this! My one fear as that the pendulum of reform is swinging far and fervently into the region of deconstruction and super-individualism in the pursuit of relevance which, we must know, always ends in the intractable morass of existential pondering. If one day, we look back and long for the simple good old days, and the orderly structures, and the process of paced discernment–all founded on centuries of tradition–then I will strain mightily not to say to my church or what is left of it: “I told you so.” Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Samuel V. Wilson, Jr. says: John Perkins says: July 9, 2012 at 10:01 pm I had lunch with a friend who served on the Vestry with me when I was Senior Warden and our church was growing for the first time in 20 years or more. He told me that he felt that there would still be an Episcopal Church around for a funeral when he needed it some time in maybe twenty years or so.I’m not that optimistic for myself.May I recommend everyone read, or re-read, Fast Food Nation? There is much to chew on in that book that would inform a committee tasked with reorganizing the Church. Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Nurya Love Parish says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service By Melodie WoermanPosted Jul 9, 2012 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Stephen Voysey says: Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Structure Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR July 10, 2012 at 7:36 am I would have to say that most of the people with whom I work in the life of the Church are concerned first of all with the ongoing mission and ministry of their own parish, whether as clergy or lay persons. Some among them feel a genuine connection to the workings of the Diocese, and offer themselves on a volunteer basis to try to make a difference at that level. Very few have much of a sense of the mission and ministry which flows from General Convention and from the Executive Council between conventions. That is not to say that the work of GC is unimportant, but rather that it seems that it is very rarely on the minds of most folks I with whom I strive to share in the work of ministry. How the Church Center is structured seems to me to be secondary to the greater need for a much broader group of church people becoming aware of the mission and ministry at that level. I am enough of an historian to know that church structures and the cultures within which those structures exist are always changing. To my mind, there has never been a “good old days,” but rather continuous challenges and responses to challenges. I see no lack of spiritual concern and hope in the younger generation; the question is how will we be able to translate that concern and hope into mission and ministry. [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] The Committee on Structure has drafted a blueprint for how General Convention can respond to the growing voices in the Episcopal Church calling for change.Resolution C095, Substitute, was adopted unanimously by the committee during its July 9 morning meeting. It grounds its action in the belief that “the Holy Spirit is urging The Episcopal Church to reimagine itself.”It creates a special task force of up to 24 people who will gather ideas in the next two years from all levels of the church about possible reforms to its structures, governance and administration. Their work will culminate in a special gathering of people from every diocese to hear what recommendations the task force plans to make to the 78th General Convention. Its final report is due by November 2014.The resolution mandates diversity in the task force membership and inclusion of people “with critical distance from the Church’s institutional leadership.” It is to be appointed by Sept. 30, 2012.Because the task force is being created under General Convention Joint Rules of Order 22, its membership must be appointed by the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies. Committee members, however, said they want to make it clear that they expect inclusion of people who aren’t part of the church’s status quo, including young adults.The task force will be accountable only to General Convention and will be “independent of other governing structures, to maintain a high degree of autonomy.” It also must report to the entire church frequently on the work it is doing.Prayed for unanimityAfter the vote was taken, at the request of the Rev. Gay Jennings, the deputies’ chair of the committee who presided over the session, members and guests sang “Sing a New Church” by Sister Delores Dufner.Later Jennings said she had hoped and prayed that the committee would reach a unanimous decision and that “people would feel it was Spirit-driven, and I think that was the case.”She noted that the committee members represented “a broad spectrum theologically, politically, spiritually across the church,” and added, “It was clear that this committee, even though we come from very different perspectives, came to a common mind to build up the church to the glory of God.“That’s why the hymn was so important to me,” she said. “That’s what we trying to do — sing a new church into being, one in faith, love and praise.”Writing group aimed for few constraintsThe framework for the final resolution was created by a writing group of 11 deputies and two bishops headed by Deputy Tom Little of Vermont and Bishop Thomas Breidenthal of Southern Ohio.Little said the drafters wanted to provide the task force the power to decide how it would operate and organize itself. The Rev. Wendy Abrahamson, deputy from Iowa, said they wanted to give them “few constraints” and instead trust that they could determine how best to undertake their work.The Rev. Michael Barlowe, deputy from California, said he thinks the most important word in the document is reimagine. “We have talked about restructure,” he said, “but reimagine is what the Holy Spirit is calling us to right now.The Very Rev. Chris Cunningham, deputy from Southern Virginia, said a critical piece is the requirement that the task force share its work regularly with the entire church. He said they are to communicate “not to Executive Council or General Convention or some other CCAB, but report back to the church, on a regular basis, to everybody.”In response, committee member Fredrica Thompsett of Massachusetts said, “I see this as a brilliant document of trust.”The committee received more than 40 resolutions calling for structural change, and this new one will take the place of all those, many of which are identical or nearly so.The driving force behind those resolutions was a proposal last fall by Bishop Stacy Sauls, the Episcopal Church’s chief operating officer, calling for a special General Convention in 2014 to begin to make changes to the church’s constitution. Because amendments to the constitution can only take place at a regular convention, attention turned to how the spirit of change could begin to take shape at this convention and lead to options for its next meeting in 2015.The resolution also requests an allocation of $400,000 in the 2013-2015 budget. The task force can decide how it wants to spend the money to do its work.The resolution now moves to the House of Deputies, where it will be debated. If passed there, it goes to the House of Bishops for consideration.— Melodie Woerman is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention.The text of Resolution C095, Substitute, follows:Resolved, the House of ________ concurring, That this General Convention, believes the Holy Spirit is urging The Episcopal Church to reimagine itself, so that, grounded in our in our rich heritage and yet open to our creative future, we may more faithfully:Proclaim the Good News of the KingdomTeach, baptize and nurture new believersRespond to human need by loving serviceSeek to transform unjust structures of societyStrive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth;and be it furtherResolved, That this General Convention establish a Task Force under the Joint Rules of Order, whose purpose shall be to present the 78th General Convention with a plan for reforming the Church’s structures, governance, and administration; and be it furtherResolved, That this Task Force shall be accountable directly to the General Convention, and independent of other governing structures, to maintain a high degree of autonomy; and be it furtherResolved, That the Task Force shall have as many as 24 members, appointed jointly by the Presiding Bishop and the President of the House of Deputies by September 30, 2012. The membership of the Task Force shall reflect the diversity of the Church, and shall include some persons with critical distance from the Church’s institutional leadership; and be it furtherResolved, That, in order to be informed by the wisdom, expertise, and commitment of the whole body of the Church, the Task Force shall gather information and ideas from congregations, dioceses and provinces, and other interested individuals and organizations, including those not often heard from; engage other resources to provide information and guidance, and shall invite all these constituencies to be joined in prayer as they engage in this common work of discernment; and be it furtherResolved, That the Task Force shall convene a special gathering to receive responses to the proposed recommendations to be brought forward to the 78th General Convention and shall invite to this gathering from each diocese at least a bishop, a lay deputy, a clerical deputy, and one person under the age of 35. It may also include representatives of institutions and communities (e.g., religious orders, seminaries, intentional communities); and be it furtherResolved, That the Task Force shall report to the whole Church frequently, and shall make its final report and recommendations to the Church by November 2014, along with the resolutions necessary to implement them, including proposed amendments to the Constitution and Canons of the Church; and be it furtherResolved, That the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance consider adding $400,000 to the 2013-2015 triennial budget, to enable this Resolution to be implemented energetically and successfully, “…for surely I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord, plans for your welfare and not for harm, to give you a future with hope.” (Jeremiah 29:11) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ General Convention 2012, Youth Minister Lorton, VA General Convention, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

20 Jun

Alaska music camps build community while teaching children

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments (5) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 By Sharon SheridanPosted Sep 6, 2012 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Dancing with the Spirit participants formed the band Beaver Fever and created a CD called Ch’aaraadzaa (“We are Dancing” in Gwich’in in Athabaskan) that’s available from the Cruikshank School in Beaver, Alaska. Pictured sitting in an old fishing boat along the Yukon River are, from left: Cole Williams, Shelby Fisher-Salmon, Jolie Murray, Jordan Billy, Allyson Fisher-Salmon, Shani Fisher-Salmon, and Julia Fisher-Salmon. Photo courtesy of Dancing with the Spirit.[Episcopal News Service] They say music’s a universal language. To the Rev. Belle Mickelson of the Diocese of Alaska, it’s also a healer and community builder.Almost two decades ago, she spent an evening drinking tea and playing music with the elders of Galena, a central-Alaskan village along the Yukon, after leading a 4-H fisheries workshop there. “I asked, ‘How are things in Galena?’ They were so depressed and discouraged because of all the suicides.”The suicide rate in Alaska is twice the national average and even higher among native Alaskans. The state also has one of the country’s highest per-capita alcohol-consumption rates.“I thought … what could I do to help?” Mickelson recounted. Noticing music’s positive impact on children, she launched a 4-H music camp for children in Cordova 18 years ago. “After five years, I knew every place should have one.”“In the midst of all this, I got the call to become a priest, and that’s what I wanted to do, was to take this program, this music, out to the villages to help with suicide and drugs and alcohol [abuse prevention].”Dancing with the Spirit music camp participant Mitch Wiehl plays the fiddle in Arctic Village, Alaska. Photo courtesy of Dancing with the Spirit.In the five-plus years since graduating from seminary, she’s been running music camps in the diocese’s native villages in a program called Dancing with the Spirit. She spends half her time in Cordova, where she works part-time at St. George’s Episcopal Church, half her time traveling. “My parish is basically lay-led half of the time.”While running music camps, Mickelson also helps at the local churches, leading services if they don’t have a priest.“I feel, really, that I have two calls. My main one is to take the music program out in the villages,” she said.Schools, tribal councils and individual donations fund Dancing with the Spirit, which so far has reached 22 native villages and held camps in the larger Alaskan communities of Fairbanks, Anchorage, Cordova, and Juneau. In 2008, a $10,000 Episcopal Church Native American/Indigenous Ministries grant and $20,000 Lutheran Deaconess Society grant helped expand the program’s reach.A $10,000 grant from the Episcopal Church’s Domestic Missionary Partnership in 2011 allowed the program to team with the Yukon Flats School District and offer a residential gospel guitar retreat in conjunction with a district volleyball tournament. “I really like the idea that we were the pep band for the volleyball game,” Mickelson said.More than 100 youngsters continue to attend the original 4-H camp each summer, with many families coming from out of town and spending the week in Cordova. The 6- through 8-year-olds learn about Hawaiian culture and dance and how to play the ukulele. For the 8- to 18-year-olds, there’s fiddle and guitar instruction. “It’s primarily bluegrass and old-time [music], but there’s a couple of rock and roll bands every year, too,” Mickelson said.St. George’s also works with the local Catholic and Baptist churches to offer a gospel-music family camp, with 65 children attending this summer. Cost is $50, with scholarships available. “If you don’t have $50, you can pay what you want,” Mickelson said.At the Dancing with the Spirit camps, students take classes in various instruments, from guitar and fiddle to mandolin, bass and ukulele. Their teaching method uses colors to code the instrument’s chords. “Any junior high or high school kid can learn to play the fiddle in a week because it’s so easy when it’s color-coded, and the same with a guitar,” Mickelson said.The instructors lead camp for a week each year but hope to visit more often. “Our goal is to go to each place two or three times a year,” she said.Instructors receive pay, food and housing. Local instructors are paid an hourly rate to teach. “We always have at least two [teachers], depending on the size of the school.”The instructors work with elementary school children in the morning, older students in the afternoons. At week’s end, the students perform in a concert, usually in conjunction with a “potlatch” or covered-dish supper, complete with square-dance instruction and Athabaskan fiddle tunes. “We just celebrate, and we try to have a community dance,” Mickelson said.Dancing with the Spirit works with local musicians and teachers and tries to leave instruments behind at each village school that hosts a camp. “Our goal is to have every school stocked with instruments,” she said.They want to see local people continue the program after they leave, she said. “I know that in a lot of schools, that’s what the kids do on their breaks: They go and play music. … What I would like to see is these local musicians hired like teachers’ aides to come in and work with the kids when we’re not there.”Music typically is not part of the curriculum in small schools, “unless the teacher happens to be a music person,” she explained.Shelby Fisher-Salmon, one of two native students on the Dancing with the Spirit board, is the lone senior among about a dozen students who attend the pre-K through 12th-grade Cruikshank School in Beaver, where her mother is the principal. Her hometown is a rural, native village of about 70 people about 100 miles north of Fairbanks. It’s reachable by boat, but people usually arrive via Navajo airplane, she said.At Cruikshank, students receive violin and guitar instruction twice weekly via videoconference.Fisher-Salmon started attending a Dancing with the Spirit camp at her school when she was about 12, learning to play guitar.“I think everyone enjoys it,” she said of the camp. “When Belle comes … the whole school usually participates.”Dancing with the Spirit and its mission to build community through music instruction for children has spread far beyond the diocese.Students at the Cordova summer camp launched a band, Bearfoot Bluegrass, that’s “been successful beyond our wildest dreams,” Mickelson said. Started in 1999, the band won the Telluride, Colorado, bluegrass band contest in 2001. Today, it continues performing and leading workshops nationally under the name Bearfoot.Cordova’s camp director, Kate Hamre, 27, played in the band from 1999 to 2010, starting at age 14. She now runs an Anchorage-based program called Bluegrass Camps for Kids that teaches music to 300 to 350 kids a year in eight to 10 camps in Alaska and elsewhere in the country, including Hawaii. She spends summers in her native Alaska and teaches during the school year at a private girls’ school in San Francisco.Hamre’s first music camp experience came in Anchorage with another program, the Alaska Folk Arts Music Camp, directed by Mary Schallert and hosted by St. Mary’s Episcopal Church. Then she learned about the Cordova camp and joined a group of students who attended both.“I learned fiddle and guitar and bass and all these different instruments,” she said. Every year, she’d look forward to seeing her friends and teachers. “It’s a great community to grow up in.”That’s Dancing with the Spirit’s greatest benefit for children, she said, noting she’s still friends with people she first played music with as an 8- or 9-year-old. “First and foremost, it provides a great sense of community with adults and their own peers. Being a musician is just something that they will always have.”Hamre sees academic benefits as well. “A lot of people don’t realize that music is pretty mathematical and creative at the same time. You’re using both left and right brains.”Said Mickelson, “I think music and art are two ways that kids build up their self-esteem so that they can have the courage to tackle math and science and these kinds of subjects.”And, like Hamre, she sees the social benefits. “In this day and age of electronics, too often kids are off and on the e-mail and Facebook and all those little games. With this program, they’re connecting with their elders and they’re connecting with each other in a really positive manner.”While the program’s success is difficult to measure, she sees “the joy that comes into the community when you’re doing this,” she said, adding, “I can just tell you how healing it’s been, when there has been a suicide, for us to come in with our music.”It’s a joy and healing she’d like to spread even further.“I really dream of this as a worldwide program,” she said.— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL September 6, 2012 at 6:48 pm As a school music teacher for almost 40 years (before retirement,) and a church musician for about 50 (continuing,) I can think of few activities more noble and inspiring than this one! Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Children, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS September 7, 2012 at 1:01 pm That sounds wonderful………………….keep on keepin on Belle…………….blessings……………..Fr. Mike martha knight says: Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Frank Jacobson says: September 6, 2012 at 6:54 pm These camps are GREAT. I worked the first on in Maui and it was so great to see the kids learn an instrument and actually preform in a band. I have several of Barefoot’s CDs and they are really good!!Keep up the good work, Belle and group!!Fr. David Featured Events Alfred Smith says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Liturgy & Music Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis David Starr says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET September 7, 2012 at 7:01 pm What a wonderful ministry. Thank you for this story. We need to hear more hopeful awe inspiring stories that weave within our own story. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release September 7, 2012 at 1:15 pm Both my husband The Rev. Dr. Al Smith and I , Stephanie Harms Smith served St. Mathew’s Mission in the early 60’s. I taught school at the BIA school as a volunteer. I love the fact that music is becoming part of the lives of the children of the village and I am sure it will enhance the lives of all the residence. Keep up the good work and bless you for all you are doing. Stephanie Smith Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Alaska music camps build community while teaching children Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Fr. Michael Neal says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more