26 Jan

College recognizes Women’s Appreciation

first_imgWomen’s Appreciation Week at Saint Mary’s College kicks off today with a variety of events aimed to spread awareness of issues many women encounter on a daily basis. “[This week approaches] women’s issues from several different perspectives because feminism comes in many different forms,” Jean Osberger, co-chair of Women’s Appreciation Week, said. The week, hosted by the Student Diversity Board (SDB), begins with a supplies drive for St. Margaret’s House, a women’s day center in South Bend. The drive will collect non-perishable food items, in-season women’s clothing (especially in sizes large and extra large), toiletries (in regular and travel sizes), feminine hygiene products and baby items. Donations will be collected through Friday in collection boxes located in every residence hall. “St. Margaret’s is a safe haven for women who are struggling in various ways in life,” SDB Representative Anabel Castaneda said. “It’s really great when we, as students, can help make another woman’s life a little easier. By helping them in any way possible, we are living out the teachings of Saint Mary’s.” Tonight, SDB will also show the film “Miss Representation” in Vander Vennet at 7:30 p.m. Castaneda said the film portrays sexism in the media. “This video really helps viewers put the role of females in the media into a bigger perspective,” she said. “The movie reflects on politicians, news anchors, and a lot of big names. It talks about how image is more the deciding factor in creating female celebrities rather than the news they tell or the roles they play. There should be no depth to how people see women. The film really focuses on looking at females as strong, capable people.” On Thursday, Saint Mary’s will host the International Student Women’s Issues Panel in the Warner Conference Room at 7:30 p.m. The panel will feature Saint Mary’s students from around the globe including representatives of Tanzania, Nicaragua, Rwanda, Australia and China. The students will discuss the daily struggles women in their home countries face. Osberger said the aim of the panel is to change misconceptions about the countries and address challenging issues in each nation. The week concludes on Friday with “Girl-Power Pump-up Music” in the Noble Family Dining Hall. Osberger said she encourages all students to come to this week’s events. “[The week] will be fun and informative,” she said. “[Students will] learn something new and the events will redefine what feminism is.” Castaneda said she hopes the events will broaden student perspective. “I really hope that students will be able to see what other opportunities there are to fight the stereotypes put against women,” she said. “They will be able to see what they can do, as an individual, to help better the world as a whole. One small action can then lead bigger movements.”last_img read more

26 Jan

Campus community stands by Te’o

first_imgLong Tran remembers his freshman and sophomore years when his roommate would lend him life advice, introduce him to other people and decompress with video games after a long day. His Dillon Hall roommate was Manti Te’o, the former Irish linebacker who became the subject of controversy and speculation less than a week ago when it was revealed his deceased girlfriend, Lennay Kekua, in fact did not exist. Tran, a senior, said he wholeheartedly believes Te’o’s side of the story, which was revealed early Saturday morning in an interview with ESPN’s Jeremy Schaap. “I do not think he had any part in this,” Tran said. “I believe he was tricked and taken advantage of and I fully believe in him. “Whatever happens, whatever people may say, he is still a source of inspiration to me, my roommate and forever my friend.” Tran said he was upset with some of the speculation and rumors he heard from people on campus immediately after the report was published. “I totally think it’s unfair the way campus [reacted],” he said. “If anyone ever met Manti or talked to him, they would know what kind of person he is and what he stood for. They would know … that he is innocent.” Support for Te’o hardly ends with Tran in Dillon Hall. Dorm rector Fr. Paul Doyle told The Observer in an interview Thursday – prior to the linebacker’s first public comments after news of the hoax broke – that he fully trusts Te’o’s character. “I don’t have time to read all the stuff that’s been written about this,” Doyle said. “The only thing I can say is I always found him to be a very honest and trustworthy person. I don’t think I misjudged him. [Jack Swarbrick] chooses to believe Manti. “I have zero reason to doubt Manti Te’o.” Notre Dame graphic design professor Anne Berry taught Te’o in a course last semester and said she cannot envision him concocting this hoax. “If he says he was duped, I have no reason not to believe him,” she said. “We live in a culture where we treat a person like a king or queen one day and a villain the next, before we know what the full facts of a given situation are. That in and of itself is unfortunate.” Berry said Te’o was a hard-working student in her class and that he always treated classmates with “respect, generosity and warmhearted affection.” “His celebrity and the reality of his rising stardom couldn’t be completely denied, however, within the context of the classroom he was simply another design student,” she said. “Not once did he ever imply that he deserved special treatment or consideration, and he took his share of critical feedback just like everyone else, without complaint.” Berry said she and Te’o spoke in general terms after it appeared both Te’o’s grandmother and Kekua had died in September, although he never specifically mentioned Kekua in their conversations. “It was clear, however, that she and his grandmother were in his thoughts which came through via a few of the design assignments he completed for my class,” Berry said. During the fall, Te’o sent a letter of support to the family of Bridget Smith, a 12-year-old girl who died in October. Her parents, Brian and Louise Smith, released a statement to The Observer in support of Te’o and stood behind the linebacker despite learning that Kekua never existed. “Manti Te’o sent us a beautiful email that we received on October 5, 2012, the day our daughter Bridget passed away after a three-year battle with a brain tumor. In that message, Manti expressed his condolences, prayers and support, and relayed these thoughts in the context of the recent loss of his grandmother and girlfriend. His message was genuine and poignant in every way. “Manti’s interactions with us were always compassionate, humble and expressed concern for our well-being and privacy. The events of the past couple of days have been very surreal, but we continue to support and believe in this generous young man with a huge heart. He helped us to get through the most difficult days of our lives, and for that, we are very grateful. Manti remains in our hearts and prayers.” Talk show host Katie Couric will sit down with Te’o and his parents this week in their first on-camera interview since the controversy emerged. The interview will be aired on Couric’s syndicated show at 4 p.m. Thursday. Several reports suggest that Ronaiah Tuiasosopo, the supposed mastermind of the hoax, will end his silence this week. Contact Andrew Owens at [email protected]last_img read more

26 Jan

A district guy’

first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the eighth and final story in a series featuring Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s graduates serving as members of Congress. This series, titled, “Trading Golden Dome for Capitol Dome,” ran on Fridays. Though he wanted to attend Notre Dame since he was eight years old, his high school guidance counselor told him he should not apply to the University because he would not be accepted. Rep. Pete Visclosky (D-IN-1) said after this experience, he resolved to never again allow someone else’s opinion diminish his belief in himself.   “It was, to this day – and I am 63 years old – the one time someone told me I can’t do something and I believed them,” Visclosky said. “It broke my heart, I went home and never applied. And my father, who is still alive at 97, just was furious. Because he said, ‘Let them tell you no, as opposed to some person who you have met once in your life.’” ‘You don’t quit’ Visclosky graduated with a B.S. in accounting from Indiana University Northwest, and then gained acceptance to Notre Dame as a law student. At Notre Dame, he was finally able to fulfill his boyhood dream. “I was, at that time, your prototypical Catholic who went to his first Notre Dame football game when he was eight years old,” Visclosky said. “They played Purdue, it rained and they lost. I thought that was the only place you would ever go to college.” His desire to study law manifested during his undergraduate career, Visclosky said. “I didn’t decide on law school until midway through college,” Visclosky said. “Looking back on my life, if you talk to anybody I grew up with, the would have said it was preordained and that they couldn’t believe I didn’t think seriously about it until college.” To this day, Visclosky said he is grateful for the education he received at Notre Dame.  “I truly did enjoy every day there,” Visclosky said. “And I did appreciate what I think the University collectively stands for. … I think by the time I got out of law school, my feelings [about the University] were probably stronger than when I got in, and it felt like I got a great legal education.” As a student at the University, Visclosky said he developed his will to fight to achieve his goals. “I think part of [the legacy of Notre Dame] is not just the sense of service [instilled] at Notre dame, but again, part of it is – maybe I’m just stuck in that eight-year-old body, that if you are Notre Dame, you don’t lose,” Visclosky said. “Yeah, our football team’s lost for 20-some years, but in my mind if you are Notre Dame, whatever that is, … you’re persistent, you work hard, you got the best training and you don’t quit.  “And somehow, you’re going to succeed.” A career in public service Though he applied to the Notre Dame Law School, Visclosky said his goal was not to practice law. His time in the seminary at age 15 helped to guide him toward a career in public service, Visclosky said. “[At 15], I was in the seminary – I wouldn’t trade that experience for the world because it made me think about my life at a very young age, and really come to two conclusions,” Visclosky said. “One is, as far as the priesthood _ I didn’t want to make one decision and have that be the rest of my life. And secondly, I did decide because history was my favorite subject and I grew up in a political household … I just said, I would like a public service career … I would have to be a politician to be involved in public service.  “The reason I went to Notre Dame is not to practice law, but hopefully to engage in a professional career.” Visclosky said his goal was to work in the Organized Crime and Racketeering section [now the Organized Crime and Gang Section] at the Department of Justice. During an interview for a position within that section, he was told they only wanted to hire people with trial experience.  His father advised him to approach then-state senator and lawyer Adam Benjamin, Visclosky said. After he spoke with Benjamin, who served in Indiana’s first Congressional seat from 1977 until his death in 1982, Visclosky said he was offered a position in Benjamin’s law firm.  “He was a great lawyer … Adam to this day had one of the most facile and quick minds I have ever encountered,” Visclosky said. “He is shrewd … and he said he just launched an election for Congress … it was the right place at the right time … I walked in the door and he said, ‘When can you start?’” The product of ‘a beer and a cheeseburger’ After joining Benjamin’s law firm, Visclosky said he worked on Congressional appropriations issues as a staff member for Benjamin. During his time with Benjamin in Washington, D.C., Visclosky said he decided to pursue his master of laws degree at Georgetown University.  “We were down the block, having a beer and a cheeseburger,” Visclosky said. “I said, ‘What do you think, Adam, about me going back to school and getting a master of laws from Georgetown?’ He looked at me and said, ‘I think it’s a great idea – if you go back, I’ll go back.’ The primary motivation, the overwhelming motivation, was that they had turned me down and I wanted to prove that I could get a Georgetown degree. … And the other motivation is that I’ve always thought, that the more options you have in life, the better opportunities you have to live a full life and make a contribution. And, I’ve always had a respect for Georgetown as well, and believed that if I got that ticket punched it couldn’t hurt me.” At Georgetown, he said he took both classes that interested him and benefited his professional work.  “It was the one time I went to school and actually took classes that I wanted to take. Legal history – never had time at Notre Dame to do that,” Visclosky said. “But most of the classes were trade classes – back in the late ’70s, early ’80s, so much of what we did here was trade-based because of the domestic steel industry and its economic implosion. So, [my Georgetown education] also had great application to the work I was doing.” He enjoyed his time at Georgetown for its educational and comic value, Visclosky said.  “I also had to quip, because Georgetown has a huge alumni [contingent] up here as you can imagine … I tell them I was riddled with so much Catholic guilt, that I had to do Jesuits for a couple of years to beat it out of me,” Visclosky said. “They beat some of it out of me.” ‘30,000 bucks in the bank’ His second legal degree helped him when he first ran for Congress, Visclosky said. “I had no name recognition, though my father’s name was known, and people make an assumption [when] they see a Notre Dame law degree and then they see a master’s in international law from Georgetown,” Visclosky said. “They said, ‘Oh, at least he has the intellectual firepower to do the job.’ Whether I did or did not, you have the appearance.” Still, tragedy vaulted him into contention for Indiana’s first congressional seat when Benjamin died of a heart attack at age 47 in Sept. of 1982.  “At the time, I didn’t have a job, I was unemployed because Mr. Benjamin died, was not married, had no family, didn’t have a mortgage payment to make and had 30,000 bucks in the bank,” Visclosky said. “At the time I thought it was a very faithful decision, a very gutsy decision, that I was laying my life on the line.   “Looking back, all I had to lose was a bit of time and 30,000 bucks. And so I said, if I’m ever going to run, I gotta do it now.” After he took office in 1985, Visclosky said he focused on connecting with his constituents. “I do work hard at it, and I try my best, that’s all I can do is my best,” Visclosky said. “I do assiduously try to stay in touch with my constituents. I will tend on the Sundays that I’m home to go to Church services in various communities, if there’s pancake festivals before, that’s where I’m at, if there’re festivals, if there’re fundraisers in the evening, every service club that meets every labor organization … people bump into me at the grocery store and my favorite question is, ‘What are you doing?’ I say, ‘I like to eat.’” Above all, Visclosky said he sees his duty and the duty of those in his office to be to serve his people.  “I hate it when I go to a public facility and someone acts like they’re doing you a favor by waiting on you – get another job,” Visclosky said. “You are there to serve people. … It’s just hard work, doing your best, and being accessible.” This dedication to service stems from his time at Notre Dame, Visclosky said.  “If there’s a value that encompasses the work [we do] every day, it’s that you are supposed to leave the world better, and certainly you have that sense from your attendance at Notre Dame,” Visclosky said. ‘A district guy’ How exactly is he working to leave the world a better place? For Visclosky, it all comes down to increasing the number of jobs in his community. “You gotta put people back to work,” Visclosky said. “You got to change the economy of Northwest Indiana. One of the great things about the job and the honor that I have is that you can do anything you want to. You see some people on the House floor every day, you see some people on the cover of ‘The New York Times’ every day, I’m a district guy. “I owe the 710,000 people of Northwest Indiana – that’s my job. Those people are my job, no one else is going to look after them if I don’t. It’s the economy that drives everything else.” Because of this goal, Visclosky said he focuses on promoting basic manufacturing at both the district and national level.   “It translates well into national policy because I do think, unfortunately for your generation, and it is a sad commentary on my life in public service, we are leaving you worse off than my parents’ generation left me,” Visclosky said.  He said he also works to promote the “good behavior of public officials” who are working to improve their communities, and to renew the lakeshore community to attract young people and create jobs for the region.  The most lasting impact of Notre Dame on his life has been his devotion to service, Visclosky said. “[The most significant effect of Notre Dame on my life today] is that sense of service,” Visclosky said. “I try not to be a prideful person but I am proud that I went to Notre Dame.” Contact Nicole Michels at [email protected]last_img read more

26 Jan

ND political science department ranks No. 10

first_imgThis August, Notre Dame’s Department of Political Science earned national recognition as the 10th-best political science program in the country from College Factual, a data-collecting college analysis website, according to a USA Today report.Keri O’Mara | The Observer Political science professor Michael C. Desch, who also serves as department chair, said he believes the rankings corroborate a long-held belief among faculty in the caliber of Notre Dame’s political science program.“It’s a reflection of what we’ve known along, which is that we have a terrific major that’s a function of a number of things, most importantly interesting subject material,” Desch said. “We have terrific faculty, who are great scholars and teachers, as well as a wide array of career options.”Joshua Kaplan, the department’s Director of Undergraduate Studies, said the rankings, which are new this year, weighed objective factors rather than assessment tools such as surveys.“Their outcome-based metrics include information about early-career and mid-career salaries,” he said.According to the department’s website, 41 percent of students were employed full-time within six months after graduation, while only one percent were looking for work. The other 58 percent were in graduate or professional school, the military, a service program or other plan, and the average salary for employed students was more than $47,500.Desch highlighted the department’s ability to prepare graduates for careers other than law.“There was a time when pre-law was our biggest pre-professional major,” Desch said. “That’s less of a big part these days, in part due to the decline in the legal employment market.”Desch said Notre Dame graduates have pursued Ph.D.s in political science as well as careers in the business and political fields.“While there is a lot of variety in what students are doing, they’re making a difference in a lot of different ways,” he said.Kaplan said he believes the major’s success stems from its ability to echo the core values of the University and the College of Arts and Letters.“We believe that ultimately the best thing a college education can do to prepare students for the future is help them understand how they can put their faith and values to work, to help them use their intellectual abilities with purpose,” Kaplan said.Desch said he hopes the department prepares its students for a lifelong career rather than a first job.“If you want to have an exciting career and also one that pays the bills, political science is one of the best ones out there,” Desch said.Tags: College of Arts and Letters, department of political science, Joshua Kaplan, Michael C. Desch, political sciencelast_img read more

26 Jan

Heritage Week to showcase SMC traditions

first_imgKeri O’Mara “We promise you discovery: the discovery of yourselves, the discovery of the universe and your place in it. We promise that you will find these marked by the Cross, that you will take possession of them in the name of the Holy Cross, our legacy and your birthright.”This quote by the College’s third president, Sr. Madeleva Wolff has now become synonymous with the meaning of a Saint Mary’s education for students, student government association (SGA) mission chair Sarah Prezek said.The quote was therefore an easy choice for this year’s Heritage Week t-shirts, part of the week-long celebration designed for students to consider the history and traditions of the College, dating back to its earliest years, Prezek said.“Heritage Week is one of the only times on campus where there are numerous opportunities to really engage with the many Belles who have gone before us and who have shaped Saint Mary’s into the great place it is today,” Prezek said.Prezek, along with the student alumnae committee, planned the week’s events, which kicked off on Sunday with a Mass at 4 p.m. in Le Mans Chapel.“I remember my first Saint Mary’s Mass as a freshman, and I barely knew anything about the College at that time, except that Le Mans [Hall] used to function as more than just a student dorm,” senior Mandy Gilbert said.“But now, after attending different Heritage Week events and being aware of all of the history and traditions that surround the school with the convent and everything, I was much more appreciative of the kick-off Mass that set the tone for the rest of the week,” Gilbert said.Monday, the week begins with Archive Tours in the basement of Madeleva Hall, led by College archivist John Kovach. Kovach, who specializes in the history of women’s baseball and also helps organize all of the exhibits in the Cushwa-Leighton library, will share information on the many trinkets and keepsakes from the early years at Saint Mary’s, Prezek said.“The Archives have a little bit of everything, from past student scrapbooks dating to the early 20th century to diaries and journals of former students and sisters,” Prezek said. “Every time I enter the Archives, it’s like traveling back through time and seeing what the lives of all of my fellow Belles were like in the College’s early years.”Also on Monday, and continuing on Tuesday, is a photo-op event in the Student Center Atrium, which will run both days during lunch time, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The photo-op event is new this year, sparked by senior Nora Clougherty’s success with the idea for the promotion of “One Day Without Shoes” for her own club, TOMS SMC campus club.The photo-op allows students to pose with large frames and/or black and white photos of former SMC students and then post the photos to social media sites to promote Heritage Week, Clougherty said.“Social media these days has become such a great way to spread news and share memories. Especially with the use of the hashtag, it makes it easy to see what other people have to say on the subject,” Clougherty said.Tuesday, the week continues with the ever-popular Riedinger House teas, Prezek said. Riedinger House, a small English cottage on campus hidden among trees and gardens, is an odd commodity for students, who continually wonder what the inside of the house is like.“Riedinger House was originally built in 1939 and used as laboratory for home economics students, which used to be a major here,” Prezek said. “Students would actually live there to practice full-time domestic tasks, which is quite different from the uses of our other College ‘laboratories’ now.”Two tea times will occur on Tuesday: the first at 2 p.m. and the second at 5 p.m. Students must RSVP on OrgSync, as there are limited spots, Prezek said.Wednesday continues with the annual Heritage Week Dinner, which will be in Stapleton Lounge of Le Mans Hall at 5 p.m. The Dinner, featuring an upscale menu and business casual attire, is offered to juniors and seniors only, along with various members of the College faculty and board members.At the dinner, Sr. Veronique Wiedower, president of the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross, will present a comprehensive “history lesson” on the College’s traditions and heritage, Prezek said.“I’m always amazed when I hear Sister’s lecture, for she is so knowledgeable and there is truly so much that students don’t know about our school,” Prezek said. “Like, for instance, who knew that the school was actually founded in Bertrand, Michigan?”On Thursday, a “Then and Now” poetry reading will take place in the top floor of the library at 6 p.m., hosted in counterpart with the staff of the SMC literary and art magazine, “Chimes.”The reading will feature poems from past students that were published in “Chimes” magazines dating back to 1892, which will be read aloud by various professors from the department of English at Saint Mary’s, Prezek said. The poems address the theme of college life and academia, as well as nature poems about South Bend.In addition, a number of current students, including many from the “Chimes” staff, have signed on to write original poems about what Saint Mary’s means to them in 2015, Prezek said.“I’m really looking forward to the poetry event, because I am interested in seeing how poems differed in the past centuries versus the present day,” Gilbert said. “It’s not often that students actually take the time to reflect on their time at Saint Mary’s, let alone in poetic form, so I think it’s a great addition to Heritage Week this year.”Also on Thursday, Wiedower will give Heritage Room tours at the convent at two times: 9-10 a.m. and 4-5 p.m.Finally, the week concludes Friday with a Saint Mary’s trivia game during lunch in the dining hall, Prezek said. The game is a fun way for students to put their knowledge of all the fun facts learned throughout the week to the test in an effort to win prizes.“We want to reward students for going to the events throughout the week and learning more about their Saint Mary’s heritage,” Prezek said. “Plus, this gives students a chance to think about SMC trivia, even if they missed out on tours of the Archives or other things this week.”Tags: Heritage Week, Sr. Madeleva Wolff, Student Government Associationlast_img read more

26 Jan

Former German president visits campus this week

first_imgFormer President of Germany Horst Koehler will deliver a lecture entitled “Citizenship in a Global Age: Personal Reflections on a Political Conundrum” at the Mendoza College of Business on Wednesday. The lecture is part of a four-day visit from Monday to Thursday by the former head of state and his wife, Eva Luise Koehler, to Notre Dame. Over the course of the visit — sponsored primarily by the Nanovic Institute for European Studies and the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study — Koehler will also speak with faculty and students about various topics as wells as visit the Harper Cancer Research Center.Koehler has enjoyed a long career in public service. In addition to serving as the president of Germany from 2004 to 2010, he also served as the managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) from 2000 to 2004, and he will soon start a new job as the United Nations’ (UN) personal envoy for Western Sahara. He has also served in numerous roles in the German Federal government. He has negotiated several international agreements on Germany’s behalf, including the German monetary union with the former East Germany, the withdrawal of Soviet troops from the former East Germany and the Maastricht Treaty on European Monetary Union.“The fact that he is seven years removed from the presidency and is still an incredibly active civil servant speaks to his tireless commitment,” Grant Osborn, communications program manager at the Institute for Advanced Study, said. “His vision as a leader seems to align with the mission of Notre Dame. Fr. Sorin wanted the university to be a powerful force for good. President Koehler espouses this idea.”Koehler and his wife paid a highly successful visit to Notre Dame in 2011 and wanted to return to the University, associate director of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study, Donald Stelluto — a key figure in arranging both the 2011 visit and this year’s visit — said.“The principle talk he delivered was called ‘The Whole is at Stake,’ in which he addressed the financial crisis in the context of moral and political systems,” Stelluto said. “The Carey Auditorium was packed with students, guests and faculty. They were just spellbound because they had someone who was talking about the complexity of politics and economics along with something they are really familiar with at Notre Dame: the moral context.”Koehler’s original visit was also hosted through the Nanovic Institute and the Institute for Advanced Study. The visit was arranged through professor Vittorio Hösle, who was director of the Institute for Advanced Study at the time and is a friend of Koehler.“I have known President Koehler personally for many years,” Hösle said. “I have a great admiration for him and think students can benefit from his integrity.”Stelluto explained that Koehler enjoyed engaging with students here and that when the possibility of a second visit was raised, Koehler said that he and his wife would “very much” like to come back.“It was just like the many other people who have come to Notre Dame and fallen in love with it,” he said. “When he came the first time it was because of a connection to Vittorio Hösle. When he came the second time, it was through a connection not only to him, but the whole University.”The original plan was for a multi-week visit this semester in which Koehler would teach a mini-course entitled “The Interdependent World.” However, the former president’s schedule changed after the UN asked him to take on the role of personal envoy for Western Sahara, Stelluto said.“He was very disappointed and asked if he could come for a few days on his way to New York. On Thursday, he is going to New York. He didn’t want to go without spending a few days at Notre Dame,” he said.While he is on campus, Koehler will have a busy schedule. By the time he has left Thursday, he will have held discussions on contemporary German society with students studying German language and literature, bridging the gap between economic theory and practice with department of Economics students and faculty, contemporary problems in Africa with faculty whose work focuses on that continent and career development with new graduate students at the Keough School of Global Affairs. In addition, he visited the Harper Cancer Research Center with his wife on Tuesday, as the couple are proponents of research into rare and neglected diseases. Thursday evening, his daughter Ulrike Koehler, a scholar of English literature, will deliver a lecture about national stereotypes in English Romanticism.“We’ll be keeping him busy,” Stelluto said.His Wednesday lecture will focus on the “potential for and limitations of national politics in meeting global challenges and the role of the individual in current global crises”, according to the Institute for Advanced Study’s website.“I imagine it’s going to be quite broad,” Osborn said referring to the lecture. “Whenever you’re speaking about global crises, there are financial, refugees, populists, concepts of nationalism, etc. There are so many things he will be able to address. It will be fascinating to see where he ventures over the course of the talk.”It will be especially interesting given the former president’s background, Osborn said — Koehler spent much of his early life as a refugee, experiences Osborn said have shaped Koehler’s public service career.“Those formative experiences shaped his understanding and brought humanity to the fore,” Osborn said. “When he was head of the IMF, one of the things he worked on was forgiving the debt of small countries. It’s quite incredible that he was thinking about the well-being of the individual.”Stelluto explained that he thinks Koehler’s ability and willingness to engage with complicated issues is a key part of his appeal.“He is willing to deal with complexity,” Stelluto said. “The human experience is not easily bifurcated. I think that’s what made him so popular in 2011: He spoke with conviction and authority but also with nuance.”Stelluto also emphasized how lucky the community is to have such a high-profile guest.“Students have an exceptional opportunity to be with someone who has been on the world stage in a number of ways,” Stelluto said. “You’re not always going to find folks on the political stage like President Koehler who will hit all of the notes.”Tags: Horst Koehler, Institute for Advanced Study, Nanovic Institute for European Studieslast_img read more

18 Jan

County Health Officials Warn Of Rabid Cat, Seeking Possible Contacts

first_imgWESTFIELD – Chautauqua County health officials are seeking the identities of anyone who might have had contact with a rabid cat in Westfield.The rabid feline was seen on Clinton Street between Franklin Street and Portage Road before Sept. 16.The stray is an adult cat, black with a white chest patch.Officials warn that rabies is almost always fatal. Anyone with information is urged to call the county health department at 716 753-4772. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

18 Jan

Three Chautauqua County Elementary Schools Moving To Remote Learning

first_imgPexels Stock Image.JAMESTOWN – Three elementary schools in Chautauqua County are moving to remote learning this week.Both Bemus Point Elementary School, Silver Creek Elementary School and School #7 in Dunkirk resume virtual learning on Monday.In a message to parents on Sunday, Bemus Point Superintendent Joe Reyda says the district’s elementary will be teaching virtually for the next two weeks. Reyda cites staffing issues at the school.“Because of the nature of the elementary situation, we are unable to adequately staff the elementary school,” Reyda said in a message to parents. “As a result, Bemus Point Elementary School will go to a virtual instruction model starting on Monday, October 26, and lasting until Friday, November 6. Please be aware that this is currently a staffing issue and not an outbreak.” He says Maple Grove Middle/High school will continue its current hybrid model.Elementary School parents are invited to attend a Zoom meeting, Monday at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m., to discuss the remote learning process.Two positive cases within the Bemus Point Central School District, one in the elementary school and one in the high school, were reported over the weekend.The Silver Creek Central School District says its Elementary School will have virtual learning through Wednesday after two staff members tested positive for the virus.The Dunkirk City School District will also engage in remote learning through Wednesday after one of their staff members tested positive for COVID-19.Anyone identified as a close contact of those who tested positive will be contacted by either the school or the Chautauqua County Department of Health. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

18 Jan

New Romantic Comedy The Diorama Opens Off-Broadway

first_imgJennifer Brown Stone and David S. Stone’s new play The Diorama opens on May 30 at The Lion Theatre at Theatre Row. Susan Louise O’Connor and Hunter Canning star in the romantic comedy under the direction of David S. Stone. The Diorama In addition to O’Connor and Canning, the cast of The Diorama includes Alberto Bonilla, Bob Greenberg and Melissa Macleod Herion. The Diorama tells the story of Janey, a Wall Street lawyer who gets more than she bargained for when her artist sister Cecily invades her NYC apartment and begins constructing a life size igloo. While the two sisters seek a sense of belonging—either in a relationship or a safe place to call home—they are haunted by the tragedies of the past. Along the way they teach each other about life, love and happiness. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on June 14, 2014 Related Showslast_img read more

18 Jan

Old Globe’s 2015-16 Season to Feature David Ives , Michael John LaChiusa & More

first_img View Comments The Old Globe’s 2015-16 will feature multiple world premieres and a recent Broadway favorite. The San Diego venue’s lineup begins on September 16 with the dance musical In Your Arms and will also include David Ives’ The Metromaniacs, the new musical Rain by Michael John LaChiusa and Sybille Pearson and Nick Payne’s Constellations.In Your Arms, directed and choreographed by Christopher Gattelli, will feature music by Tony winner Stephen Flaherty. The revue will showcase ten dance vignettes accompanied by pieces by Douglas Carter Beane, Christopher Durang, Carrie Fisher, Terrence McNally and more.Following In Your Arms is Full Gallop, based on the life of fashion honcho Diana Vreeland, which will begin on September 26. Oscar and Tony winner Mercedes Ruehl will star in the one-woman show, which is written by Mark Hampton and Mary Louise Wilson.On January 30, 2016, the Old Globe will premiere Ives’ The Metromaniacs, directed by Michael Kahn. The comedy calls upon the tropes of a classic French farce—complete with mistaken identity, plot twists and poetry.The season will also feature the premiere of Anna Ziegler’s The Last Match set inside the minds of two tennis players, as well as Rain (set to begin on March 24, 2016), a new musical by LaChiusa and Pearson. Directed by Barry Edelstein, the tuner is based on a short story by Somerset Maugham and follows a group of American travels in a South Pacific boarding house.Molly Smith, who helmed Camp David at Arena Stage in 2014, will direct the play by Pulitzer Prize winner Lawrence Wright again, beginning May 12, 2016. Next, on May 28, the Old Globe will present Kimber Lee’s tokyo fish story.The season will also include the annual presentation of Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, as well as Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing and As You Like It as part of the new Globe for All program and the partnership for University of San Diego Graduate Theatre Program.last_img read more