20 Jun

Episcopal Church, Virginia prevail as court refuses to revise decision

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] Seven breakaway congregations have been ordered by a judge to return control of church property to the Diocese of Virginia by April 30.Fairfax County Circuit Court Judge Randy I. Bellows set that date after he refused March 1 to reconsider, as requested by the congregations, the part of his Jan. 10 opinion in which he said that some personal property, including monetary gifts, given to the congregations prior to January 31, 2007, belongs to the diocese.Bellows’ actions were meant to implement his Jan. 10 opinion that the diocese and the Episcopal Church “have a contractual and proprietary interest in the property of these Episcopal churches” for use in the church’s mission and ministry. He added that while congregations “had an absolute right to depart from [the Episcopal Church] and the diocese, they had no right to take these seven Episcopal churches with them.”The real property includes seven church buildings and a significant number of other parcels. The personal property includes both tangible items, such as chalices, prayer books and crosses, and intangibles, including the funds on hand, the diocese said in a press release  issued close to midnight on March 1.Bellows ordered that the specific inventory of items be based on what he called the “ownership determination date,” which he set at either Jan. 31, 2007, or Feb. 1, 2007, the dates the diocese formally filed for legal action to recover its property.Bellows issued his order the day after he held a hearing on the issues. The text of the order is here.The ruling allows the CANA congregations to retain some restricted funds over which they have no discretion and that do not benefit the local congregation, the diocese or the Episcopal Church, according to the release. The parties have until March 30 to determine the disposition of that money. Where the parties do not agree, the court will decide.The majority of members and clergy of the seven parishes left to form congregations of the Convocation of Anglicans in North America (CANA), which the Anglican Province of Nigeria began in 2005. The departing members of those congregations then filed claims to parish property under Virginia law.“We hope that this will mark the end of this lengthy litigation,” Virginia Bishop Shannon S. Johnston said in the diocesan release. “By closing this chapter, both the diocese and the CANA congregations have the freedom to focus our energies on the mission and ministries of our respective congregations, and even what we might be able to do together for people and a world in need of the gospel’s work.”Johnston added that the diocese has begun an initiative known as Dayspring, which he said was “an integrated effort to discern and implement a comprehensive vision for our congregations and properties affected by this litigation.”Henry D.W. Burt, secretary of the diocese, called the court’s order “a major milestone in this effort,” and added that the diocese “respect[s] fully the CANA congregations’ right to pursue an appeal, and we are in discussions with them as they face significant issues of discernment and transition in their path forward.”Jim Oakes, spokesperson for the seven congregations, said in a press release that “while our congregations will comply with the final order, we are saddened that the Circuit Court did not accept the motion for partial reconsideration and we continue to believe that, as a matter of religious liberty, it is the right of donors to restrict the use of their own gifts to the church of their choice.”The congregations are “prayerfully considering their legal options,” the release said.“We have always known that a church is not just its buildings, but its people and the transforming gospel of Jesus Christ being proclaimed and lived. We look forward to God leading us in the days ahead,” the Rev. John Yates, rector of the breakaway portion of the Falls Church, said in the same release.Yates had told his congregation on Feb. 22 that “our intention is to move all staff offices to a convenient nearby office building later this spring, and to shift our Sunday worship services to nearby locations” after the deadline set by Bellows. Some of those worship locations have been determined, others have not, he said.Yates also said that the congregation “may very well be led” to change its name from Falls Church Anglican. It has already moved its website to http://www.tfcanglican.org/ from http://www.thefallschurch.org. The Episcopal congregation is located here on the web.Bellow’s Jan. 10 opinion stemmed from a June 2010 decision of the Virginia Supreme Court that found he erred in an earlier ruling when he said that the breakaway congregations involved in the cases were entitled to retain all the parishes’ real and personal property when they left the Episcopal Church and joined another denomination.In June 2010, the Supreme Court held that although disagreements had caused “a division” within the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Virginia, the breakaway congregations had affiliated with a church that was not a branch of either the Episcopal Church or the diocese. Such an affiliation is required, the court said, for Virginia’s one-of-a-kind “Division Statute” (Section 57-9(A)) to apply, as the breakaway congregations claimed.The Supreme Court returned the cases to the lower court for further proceedings to resolve the property claims of the Episcopal Church and the diocese “under principles of real property and contract law.” Bellows held a trial that lasted 22 days stretched over April, May and June 2011, and included testimony by 60 witnesses. He wrote that he also reviewed thousands of pages of post-trial briefs.In coming to his Jan. 10 opinion, Bellows reviewed Virginia statutes governing church property, the deeds to the real property of the churches, the governing rules of the diocese and the Episcopal Church, and the historic relationship between the parishes and the larger church.He concluded state statutes support a finding that a local congregation is obligated to comply with the “laws, rules and ecclesiastical polity” of the denomination with regard to property and that the constitution and canons of both the diocese and the Episcopal Church “demonstrate pervasive dominion, management, and control over local church property, in a manner normally associated with ownership, title, and possession.” Bellows said the deeds in question make clear that the property “cannot be removed from the denomination without the larger church’s consent.”More information about the cases, including all court filings, is available here.The case originally involved members of 11 congregations of the Virginia diocese but the diocese settled with four of the congregations in the intervening years, including Potomac Falls Church in Potomac Falls and Christ the Redeemer Church in Chantilly, neither of which held any real property.The diocese agreed to lease the property of Church of the Word in Prince William County to the breakaway members for five years. The Oatlands congregation announced the purchase of a tract of land where they are building a new church. Church of Our Saviour in Loudon County retained the property after paying the diocese $1.95 million, according to Burt. Both congregations agreed to disaffiliate from CANA for a period of time.The remaining churches are Truro Church, The Church at the Falls – The Falls Church (Arlington), Church of the Apostles (Fairfax), Church of the Epiphany (Fairfax), St. Margaret’s Church (Woodbridge), St. Paul’s Church (Haymarket) and St. Stephen’s Church (Northumberland County).— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. March 6, 2012 at 8:04 pm While not a lawyer, I believe the governing principle has been alluded to by R.A. Garcia, “When the TEC or the PECUSA took over.” Some also suggest the precedent of Crown patents, contacts, and feds were preempted by the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the subsequent precedent set within state and National Conditional law. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC March 3, 2012 at 7:41 pm Regardless of theology, TEC owns the buildings, not the ACNA or any other CANA denomination. It’s one thing to create a different structure on theological tenets; it’s another to illegally commandeer property because of those differences. Let’s say one local bank likes Citi better than PNC, their current hierarchy. Yet, it cannot legally confiscate PNC’s building in order to become a Citi branch. Citi has to build a new building. Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Michael Neal says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Matthew Davies says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books March 4, 2012 at 3:43 pm The Church is not a building. Let them have the buildings. God is purging HIS church, those who believe in the authority of scripture and those who do not. TEC will keep going to the ways of the world, CANA and 80% of the rest of the Anglican Communion will follow Christ. So mote it be……. March 6, 2012 at 8:26 am Dear Chantal, At the top of every article, directly underneath the byline, is a + icon next to the word “Share”. This button enables readers to share our content via an email pop up, through various email clients, or on social media networks. I hope this helps. March 5, 2012 at 1:42 pm WHEN THE TEC or PECUSA TOOK OVER THE ENGLISH CHURCHES IN AMERICA, THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND HAD PROPRIETARY RIGHTS OVER ALL THOSE STRUCTURES, MONIES, RELICS, LANDS et al.? Please do notice, that some of these churches were built prior to the establishment of the USA. John Flynn says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Fred Freeling says: Rector Washington, DC Tony Green says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 2, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis May 4, 2012 at 9:44 am Of the 11 churches that elected to “go to Nigeria”:Two have no real property, so there is no issue.Two settled with the diocese before 2012. One of these left CANA and has accepted the oversight of Bishop Johnston (VA).St Stephen’s, St Margaret’s and Epiphany amicably returned their property to continuing congregations of Episcopalians.Truro reached two-year lease back agreement with the diocese. They conveyed deeds etc to the diocese. The friendship developed between Truro’s rector and Bp. Johnston may lead to a more positive outcome in the future.The Falls Church agreed to return its property to the Episcopal Falls Church. Then they reneged on the agreement. After the April 27 hearing before Judge Bellows, the judge told them to vacate by April 30. The diocese graciously is allowing them until May 15 to return the property.And then there was one — The Church of the Apostles. The Church of the Apostles publishes “prophecies” received by members in their weekly newsletter. These appear to be represented as having the authority of scripture. Their building is actually an industrial facility that is suitable for a Costco or a tire warehouse. There is no continuing congregation.Has the diocese suffered financially from the loss of these congregations? No. These churches haven’t contributed to the diocese in years. Even so they showed up at council meetings and were very vocal in opposing actions desired by Episcopal congregations. No church can grow in the midst of conflict. The Diocese of Virginia has a chance for a new beginning without the drag of schismatics and heretics. I give total credit to Bishop Shannon Johnston for managing this process in gracious pastoral manner. I wish I were as charitable as he is. Property Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Tony Green says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID March 6, 2012 at 8:06 pm P.S., contracts and deeds. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Chantal Andrews says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Philip Jones, Reston VA says: Dick Reynolds says: Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL March 21, 2012 at 11:09 pm Undoubtedly they will sell the property to growing congregations of the charismatic persuasion March 3, 2012 at 3:20 pm When our church recovered its property from the CANA group, we struggled. They had left us with a huge mortgage, no vestry or permanent Rector. Here we are five years later growing steadily in faith and numbers, to the point that I believe we now have a larger congregation than the breakaways.It was amazing how many people were willing to take over the tasks of running the parish. The Virginia churches can do no less. Keep the Faith. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 March 3, 2012 at 3:46 pm Hello,This new format of ENS makes it difficult to forward or share articles of particular interest.It was easy to forward to the entire congregation, sending the article to my e-mail address with Bcc to the group. Do you have any suggestions? Thanks.Chantal AndrewsAll Soul’s Episcopal ChurchRidgecrest, CA Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (11) Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ March 3, 2012 at 2:26 pm What will the Episcopal Church do with all those empty buildings? Will they sit as shrines to the will of man? Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church, Virginia prevail as court refuses to revise decision Breakaway congregations given deadline for property return Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service R.A. Garcia says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab James Pirrung says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

20 Jun

Structure Committee calls for task force to recommend ways to…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Structure Committee calls for task force to recommend ways to reform July 9, 2012 at 2:14 pm From what I know of the conversation, I don’t expect that it will end in the intractable morass of existential pondering, but rather in the Great Commission to proclaim the gospel, particularly to emerging generations and those who no longer feel (or never did feel) a connection to the body of Christ. I thank God for the Structure Committee and their hard work in developing this resolution. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Comments (4) Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 9, 2012 at 12:48 pm So, it is proposed that the Episcopal Church re-invent itself in three years! As the Articles of Confederation gave way to the U.S. Constitution during a period of passionate debate and earnest apologia, so is our church now poising itself on the cusp of turbulent–perhaps rancorous– discussion. We must be prepared for this! My one fear as that the pendulum of reform is swinging far and fervently into the region of deconstruction and super-individualism in the pursuit of relevance which, we must know, always ends in the intractable morass of existential pondering. If one day, we look back and long for the simple good old days, and the orderly structures, and the process of paced discernment–all founded on centuries of tradition–then I will strain mightily not to say to my church or what is left of it: “I told you so.” Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Samuel V. Wilson, Jr. says: John Perkins says: July 9, 2012 at 10:01 pm I had lunch with a friend who served on the Vestry with me when I was Senior Warden and our church was growing for the first time in 20 years or more. He told me that he felt that there would still be an Episcopal Church around for a funeral when he needed it some time in maybe twenty years or so.I’m not that optimistic for myself.May I recommend everyone read, or re-read, Fast Food Nation? There is much to chew on in that book that would inform a committee tasked with reorganizing the Church. Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Nurya Love Parish says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service By Melodie WoermanPosted Jul 9, 2012 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Stephen Voysey says: Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Structure Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR July 10, 2012 at 7:36 am I would have to say that most of the people with whom I work in the life of the Church are concerned first of all with the ongoing mission and ministry of their own parish, whether as clergy or lay persons. Some among them feel a genuine connection to the workings of the Diocese, and offer themselves on a volunteer basis to try to make a difference at that level. Very few have much of a sense of the mission and ministry which flows from General Convention and from the Executive Council between conventions. That is not to say that the work of GC is unimportant, but rather that it seems that it is very rarely on the minds of most folks I with whom I strive to share in the work of ministry. How the Church Center is structured seems to me to be secondary to the greater need for a much broader group of church people becoming aware of the mission and ministry at that level. I am enough of an historian to know that church structures and the cultures within which those structures exist are always changing. To my mind, there has never been a “good old days,” but rather continuous challenges and responses to challenges. I see no lack of spiritual concern and hope in the younger generation; the question is how will we be able to translate that concern and hope into mission and ministry. [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] The Committee on Structure has drafted a blueprint for how General Convention can respond to the growing voices in the Episcopal Church calling for change.Resolution C095, Substitute, was adopted unanimously by the committee during its July 9 morning meeting. It grounds its action in the belief that “the Holy Spirit is urging The Episcopal Church to reimagine itself.”It creates a special task force of up to 24 people who will gather ideas in the next two years from all levels of the church about possible reforms to its structures, governance and administration. Their work will culminate in a special gathering of people from every diocese to hear what recommendations the task force plans to make to the 78th General Convention. Its final report is due by November 2014.The resolution mandates diversity in the task force membership and inclusion of people “with critical distance from the Church’s institutional leadership.” It is to be appointed by Sept. 30, 2012.Because the task force is being created under General Convention Joint Rules of Order 22, its membership must be appointed by the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies. Committee members, however, said they want to make it clear that they expect inclusion of people who aren’t part of the church’s status quo, including young adults.The task force will be accountable only to General Convention and will be “independent of other governing structures, to maintain a high degree of autonomy.” It also must report to the entire church frequently on the work it is doing.Prayed for unanimityAfter the vote was taken, at the request of the Rev. Gay Jennings, the deputies’ chair of the committee who presided over the session, members and guests sang “Sing a New Church” by Sister Delores Dufner.Later Jennings said she had hoped and prayed that the committee would reach a unanimous decision and that “people would feel it was Spirit-driven, and I think that was the case.”She noted that the committee members represented “a broad spectrum theologically, politically, spiritually across the church,” and added, “It was clear that this committee, even though we come from very different perspectives, came to a common mind to build up the church to the glory of God.“That’s why the hymn was so important to me,” she said. “That’s what we trying to do — sing a new church into being, one in faith, love and praise.”Writing group aimed for few constraintsThe framework for the final resolution was created by a writing group of 11 deputies and two bishops headed by Deputy Tom Little of Vermont and Bishop Thomas Breidenthal of Southern Ohio.Little said the drafters wanted to provide the task force the power to decide how it would operate and organize itself. The Rev. Wendy Abrahamson, deputy from Iowa, said they wanted to give them “few constraints” and instead trust that they could determine how best to undertake their work.The Rev. Michael Barlowe, deputy from California, said he thinks the most important word in the document is reimagine. “We have talked about restructure,” he said, “but reimagine is what the Holy Spirit is calling us to right now.The Very Rev. Chris Cunningham, deputy from Southern Virginia, said a critical piece is the requirement that the task force share its work regularly with the entire church. He said they are to communicate “not to Executive Council or General Convention or some other CCAB, but report back to the church, on a regular basis, to everybody.”In response, committee member Fredrica Thompsett of Massachusetts said, “I see this as a brilliant document of trust.”The committee received more than 40 resolutions calling for structural change, and this new one will take the place of all those, many of which are identical or nearly so.The driving force behind those resolutions was a proposal last fall by Bishop Stacy Sauls, the Episcopal Church’s chief operating officer, calling for a special General Convention in 2014 to begin to make changes to the church’s constitution. Because amendments to the constitution can only take place at a regular convention, attention turned to how the spirit of change could begin to take shape at this convention and lead to options for its next meeting in 2015.The resolution also requests an allocation of $400,000 in the 2013-2015 budget. The task force can decide how it wants to spend the money to do its work.The resolution now moves to the House of Deputies, where it will be debated. If passed there, it goes to the House of Bishops for consideration.— Melodie Woerman is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention.The text of Resolution C095, Substitute, follows:Resolved, the House of ________ concurring, That this General Convention, believes the Holy Spirit is urging The Episcopal Church to reimagine itself, so that, grounded in our in our rich heritage and yet open to our creative future, we may more faithfully:Proclaim the Good News of the KingdomTeach, baptize and nurture new believersRespond to human need by loving serviceSeek to transform unjust structures of societyStrive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth;and be it furtherResolved, That this General Convention establish a Task Force under the Joint Rules of Order, whose purpose shall be to present the 78th General Convention with a plan for reforming the Church’s structures, governance, and administration; and be it furtherResolved, That this Task Force shall be accountable directly to the General Convention, and independent of other governing structures, to maintain a high degree of autonomy; and be it furtherResolved, That the Task Force shall have as many as 24 members, appointed jointly by the Presiding Bishop and the President of the House of Deputies by September 30, 2012. The membership of the Task Force shall reflect the diversity of the Church, and shall include some persons with critical distance from the Church’s institutional leadership; and be it furtherResolved, That, in order to be informed by the wisdom, expertise, and commitment of the whole body of the Church, the Task Force shall gather information and ideas from congregations, dioceses and provinces, and other interested individuals and organizations, including those not often heard from; engage other resources to provide information and guidance, and shall invite all these constituencies to be joined in prayer as they engage in this common work of discernment; and be it furtherResolved, That the Task Force shall convene a special gathering to receive responses to the proposed recommendations to be brought forward to the 78th General Convention and shall invite to this gathering from each diocese at least a bishop, a lay deputy, a clerical deputy, and one person under the age of 35. It may also include representatives of institutions and communities (e.g., religious orders, seminaries, intentional communities); and be it furtherResolved, That the Task Force shall report to the whole Church frequently, and shall make its final report and recommendations to the Church by November 2014, along with the resolutions necessary to implement them, including proposed amendments to the Constitution and Canons of the Church; and be it furtherResolved, That the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance consider adding $400,000 to the 2013-2015 triennial budget, to enable this Resolution to be implemented energetically and successfully, “…for surely I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord, plans for your welfare and not for harm, to give you a future with hope.” (Jeremiah 29:11) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ General Convention 2012, Youth Minister Lorton, VA General Convention, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

20 Jun

Alaska music camps build community while teaching children

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments (5) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 By Sharon SheridanPosted Sep 6, 2012 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Dancing with the Spirit participants formed the band Beaver Fever and created a CD called Ch’aaraadzaa (“We are Dancing” in Gwich’in in Athabaskan) that’s available from the Cruikshank School in Beaver, Alaska. Pictured sitting in an old fishing boat along the Yukon River are, from left: Cole Williams, Shelby Fisher-Salmon, Jolie Murray, Jordan Billy, Allyson Fisher-Salmon, Shani Fisher-Salmon, and Julia Fisher-Salmon. Photo courtesy of Dancing with the Spirit.[Episcopal News Service] They say music’s a universal language. To the Rev. Belle Mickelson of the Diocese of Alaska, it’s also a healer and community builder.Almost two decades ago, she spent an evening drinking tea and playing music with the elders of Galena, a central-Alaskan village along the Yukon, after leading a 4-H fisheries workshop there. “I asked, ‘How are things in Galena?’ They were so depressed and discouraged because of all the suicides.”The suicide rate in Alaska is twice the national average and even higher among native Alaskans. The state also has one of the country’s highest per-capita alcohol-consumption rates.“I thought … what could I do to help?” Mickelson recounted. Noticing music’s positive impact on children, she launched a 4-H music camp for children in Cordova 18 years ago. “After five years, I knew every place should have one.”“In the midst of all this, I got the call to become a priest, and that’s what I wanted to do, was to take this program, this music, out to the villages to help with suicide and drugs and alcohol [abuse prevention].”Dancing with the Spirit music camp participant Mitch Wiehl plays the fiddle in Arctic Village, Alaska. Photo courtesy of Dancing with the Spirit.In the five-plus years since graduating from seminary, she’s been running music camps in the diocese’s native villages in a program called Dancing with the Spirit. She spends half her time in Cordova, where she works part-time at St. George’s Episcopal Church, half her time traveling. “My parish is basically lay-led half of the time.”While running music camps, Mickelson also helps at the local churches, leading services if they don’t have a priest.“I feel, really, that I have two calls. My main one is to take the music program out in the villages,” she said.Schools, tribal councils and individual donations fund Dancing with the Spirit, which so far has reached 22 native villages and held camps in the larger Alaskan communities of Fairbanks, Anchorage, Cordova, and Juneau. In 2008, a $10,000 Episcopal Church Native American/Indigenous Ministries grant and $20,000 Lutheran Deaconess Society grant helped expand the program’s reach.A $10,000 grant from the Episcopal Church’s Domestic Missionary Partnership in 2011 allowed the program to team with the Yukon Flats School District and offer a residential gospel guitar retreat in conjunction with a district volleyball tournament. “I really like the idea that we were the pep band for the volleyball game,” Mickelson said.More than 100 youngsters continue to attend the original 4-H camp each summer, with many families coming from out of town and spending the week in Cordova. The 6- through 8-year-olds learn about Hawaiian culture and dance and how to play the ukulele. For the 8- to 18-year-olds, there’s fiddle and guitar instruction. “It’s primarily bluegrass and old-time [music], but there’s a couple of rock and roll bands every year, too,” Mickelson said.St. George’s also works with the local Catholic and Baptist churches to offer a gospel-music family camp, with 65 children attending this summer. Cost is $50, with scholarships available. “If you don’t have $50, you can pay what you want,” Mickelson said.At the Dancing with the Spirit camps, students take classes in various instruments, from guitar and fiddle to mandolin, bass and ukulele. Their teaching method uses colors to code the instrument’s chords. “Any junior high or high school kid can learn to play the fiddle in a week because it’s so easy when it’s color-coded, and the same with a guitar,” Mickelson said.The instructors lead camp for a week each year but hope to visit more often. “Our goal is to go to each place two or three times a year,” she said.Instructors receive pay, food and housing. Local instructors are paid an hourly rate to teach. “We always have at least two [teachers], depending on the size of the school.”The instructors work with elementary school children in the morning, older students in the afternoons. At week’s end, the students perform in a concert, usually in conjunction with a “potlatch” or covered-dish supper, complete with square-dance instruction and Athabaskan fiddle tunes. “We just celebrate, and we try to have a community dance,” Mickelson said.Dancing with the Spirit works with local musicians and teachers and tries to leave instruments behind at each village school that hosts a camp. “Our goal is to have every school stocked with instruments,” she said.They want to see local people continue the program after they leave, she said. “I know that in a lot of schools, that’s what the kids do on their breaks: They go and play music. … What I would like to see is these local musicians hired like teachers’ aides to come in and work with the kids when we’re not there.”Music typically is not part of the curriculum in small schools, “unless the teacher happens to be a music person,” she explained.Shelby Fisher-Salmon, one of two native students on the Dancing with the Spirit board, is the lone senior among about a dozen students who attend the pre-K through 12th-grade Cruikshank School in Beaver, where her mother is the principal. Her hometown is a rural, native village of about 70 people about 100 miles north of Fairbanks. It’s reachable by boat, but people usually arrive via Navajo airplane, she said.At Cruikshank, students receive violin and guitar instruction twice weekly via videoconference.Fisher-Salmon started attending a Dancing with the Spirit camp at her school when she was about 12, learning to play guitar.“I think everyone enjoys it,” she said of the camp. “When Belle comes … the whole school usually participates.”Dancing with the Spirit and its mission to build community through music instruction for children has spread far beyond the diocese.Students at the Cordova summer camp launched a band, Bearfoot Bluegrass, that’s “been successful beyond our wildest dreams,” Mickelson said. Started in 1999, the band won the Telluride, Colorado, bluegrass band contest in 2001. Today, it continues performing and leading workshops nationally under the name Bearfoot.Cordova’s camp director, Kate Hamre, 27, played in the band from 1999 to 2010, starting at age 14. She now runs an Anchorage-based program called Bluegrass Camps for Kids that teaches music to 300 to 350 kids a year in eight to 10 camps in Alaska and elsewhere in the country, including Hawaii. She spends summers in her native Alaska and teaches during the school year at a private girls’ school in San Francisco.Hamre’s first music camp experience came in Anchorage with another program, the Alaska Folk Arts Music Camp, directed by Mary Schallert and hosted by St. Mary’s Episcopal Church. Then she learned about the Cordova camp and joined a group of students who attended both.“I learned fiddle and guitar and bass and all these different instruments,” she said. Every year, she’d look forward to seeing her friends and teachers. “It’s a great community to grow up in.”That’s Dancing with the Spirit’s greatest benefit for children, she said, noting she’s still friends with people she first played music with as an 8- or 9-year-old. “First and foremost, it provides a great sense of community with adults and their own peers. Being a musician is just something that they will always have.”Hamre sees academic benefits as well. “A lot of people don’t realize that music is pretty mathematical and creative at the same time. You’re using both left and right brains.”Said Mickelson, “I think music and art are two ways that kids build up their self-esteem so that they can have the courage to tackle math and science and these kinds of subjects.”And, like Hamre, she sees the social benefits. “In this day and age of electronics, too often kids are off and on the e-mail and Facebook and all those little games. With this program, they’re connecting with their elders and they’re connecting with each other in a really positive manner.”While the program’s success is difficult to measure, she sees “the joy that comes into the community when you’re doing this,” she said, adding, “I can just tell you how healing it’s been, when there has been a suicide, for us to come in with our music.”It’s a joy and healing she’d like to spread even further.“I really dream of this as a worldwide program,” she said.— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL September 6, 2012 at 6:48 pm As a school music teacher for almost 40 years (before retirement,) and a church musician for about 50 (continuing,) I can think of few activities more noble and inspiring than this one! Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Children, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS September 7, 2012 at 1:01 pm That sounds wonderful………………….keep on keepin on Belle…………….blessings……………..Fr. Mike martha knight says: Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Frank Jacobson says: September 6, 2012 at 6:54 pm These camps are GREAT. I worked the first on in Maui and it was so great to see the kids learn an instrument and actually preform in a band. I have several of Barefoot’s CDs and they are really good!!Keep up the good work, Belle and group!!Fr. David Featured Events Alfred Smith says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Liturgy & Music Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis David Starr says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET September 7, 2012 at 7:01 pm What a wonderful ministry. Thank you for this story. We need to hear more hopeful awe inspiring stories that weave within our own story. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release September 7, 2012 at 1:15 pm Both my husband The Rev. Dr. Al Smith and I , Stephanie Harms Smith served St. Mathew’s Mission in the early 60’s. I taught school at the BIA school as a volunteer. I love the fact that music is becoming part of the lives of the children of the village and I am sure it will enhance the lives of all the residence. Keep up the good work and bless you for all you are doing. Stephanie Smith Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Alaska music camps build community while teaching children Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Fr. Michael Neal says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

20 Jun

No man (or nation) is an island

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME No man (or nation) is an island Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Religion News Service] Manhattan was a traffic nightmare as the United Nations General Assembly was in session and security precautions ramped up.Iran’s president gave his usual insulting address. Israel’s prime minister volleyed with dire warnings of Iran’s nuclear-weapons intentions. Not much was expected of a session that was more political podium than problem solving.But the event did underscore a reality that Americans often overlook: Not everything is about us. The world doesn’t turn on a politician’s latest line of attack. The fine points of Obamacare or Mitt Romney’s 1040 or Paul Ryan’s budget? Meh.On the one hand, this unconcern is nothing unusual; hometown affairs are always of far more interest to locals than to anyone else. I could go months without caring about Kate Middleton’s topless cavorting or political show trials in Beijing.On the other hand, it is good to be reminded that we are one piece of a vast global mosaic. We connect with others but aren’t necessarily the center.Rather than proceed as a nation-level version of the “narcissistic princess” — as one reviewer labeled tell-all author Monica Lewinsky — we should pay more attention to the connections among us.It matters whether we show respect to other peoples. It matters whether we play fair when our interests converge. It matters whether we overcome our bullying instinct when our interests collide. It matters whether we preserve our own freedom by the sword or by affirming others’ rights to self-determination.In our volatile, ambiguous and interconnected world, raw nationalism has become a danger to civilization. Literally so, as horrific weapons pass into highly unstable hands guided by the least enlightened of tribal and national instincts.Learning to respect other peoples, and to imagine their needs as legitimate as our own, is a critical component of modern wisdom.Religious fervor isn’t a new threat to the human condition — indeed, it might be the oldest threat — but lately religious fervor has morphed into a religious extremism that has sent violence hopscotching around the globe in search of soft targets.If we can’t find common ground, we risk global annihilation.Rather than press on toward destruction, it’s time we learned the ancient Stoic principle called “adiaphora,” or “things indifferent.” It states that some things matter more than others, and some things don’t matter much at all. To Christians, for example, the resurrection of Jesus does matter; what time the Sunday service is held doesn’t matter.Adiaphora was presented to me as explaining Anglicanism’s preference for compromise, for the middle way, for loving persons more than right opinion. It explains the thought gap between fundamentalist and progressive Christianity, two sincere and well-grounded schools of faith that differ over absolutes and right opinion.The challenge, of course, is to discern what matters and what doesn’t. Adiaphora’s answer is to say it’s all relative. What matters for you might not matter for me. When our interests collide, your being right or my being right won’t matter as much as our being one in God. We are likely to find more truth in forgiveness and forbearance than in consistency and self-crafted righteousness.As soft and soupy as it might sound, humanity’s future is at stake. The time has come for earnest people to put down their doctrines and swords and to join hands.— Tom Ehrich is a writer, church consultant and Episcopal priest based in New York. He is the author of “Just Wondering, Jesus” and founder of the Church Wellness Project. His website is www.morningwalkmedia.com. Follow Tom on Twitter @tomehrich. By Tom EhrichPosted Oct 3, 2012 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

20 Jun

Born to be ‘bikers’: Motorcycle ministries reach out to under-served

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA September 17, 2013 at 1:36 pm Great story……………………..great ministry and witness……………blessings…….! Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Fr. Michael Neal says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Lori Hale Babcock says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Isaiah Chong says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Robert w. Scruggs says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 August 29, 2013 at 2:42 pm I was a late-arrival to the Episcopal Church, and upon entering St. Nicholas Episcopal Church in Kapolei, Hawaii, of which the Rev. Paul Klitzke is vicar, I knew I had found a home. Fr. Paul’s outward appearance, though may be startling to others, served as a sign to me, a sign of God’s unconditional love for all and reminds us of the come-as-you-are mentality so many churches and denominations have forgotten; All should be welcomed to church, regardless to tattoos, bikes, gender, finances, skin colour, without regard to anything at all! After seeing the “rock star vicar,” yes, Fr. Paul only mentioned his tatts and Kawasaki, but he’s also a great rocker and makes our church a lively one, I am glad to see St. Nick’s and its vicar got the attention of ENS, and I hope our church will continue to proclaim the gospel for years to come!Don’t forget to visit St. Nick’s online!http://www.stnickschurch.episcopalhawaii.org/ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Janet MacKenzie says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Canon William “Jay” Geisler has baptized during a biker rally over a motorcycle sidecar, performed weddings with the bridal couple in black leather and sparked rousing cheers when he told mourners “there’s only two types of bikers — those who have gone down and those who will go down.”“Someone got up [at a funeral] and asked ‘where’s Billy?’ and I started talking about God’s love for all of us. I said he’s with God of course,” Geisler recalled during a recent interview. “Everybody erupted with cheers of happiness, because they’ve been told they’re bad people.”An avid biker, Geisler, 57, rector of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Pittsburgh, realized the need for a motorcycle ministry after a biker said to him, “you don’t know what it’s like to look like Frankenstein and have the heart of Shirley Temple.”He and other biker priests say their love of motorcycles has opened up new avenues to proclaim the Gospel to an overlooked and underserved community.Motorcycle masses in MarylandThe Rev. Steve McCarty was inspired to begin a motorcycle ministry after another biker asked about the Episcopal shield on his jacket.“I said, yeah I’m an Episcopal priest,” recalled McCarty, a biker since age 16. “We spent an hour and a half talking about his faith and how he’d been shunned from the church he was at, how they didn’t accept him, and he didn’t think he was good enough to go there.Biker priest the Rev. Steve McCarty, vicar at St. Andrew’s Church in Clear Springs, Maryland. Photo: Episcopal Diocese of Maryland“He knew Scripture. He said, ‘I need someplace where I can be accepted the way I am.’ I thought, maybe I’ll do something about it,” said McCarty, vicar at St. Andrew’s Church in Clear Springs, Maryland.He began holding motorcycle masses one Saturday evening a month in June 2012 at St. Mark’s Church in Lappans. The services have grown to about 30 regular worshipers.After Eucharist, “if the weather’s good, we take a short ride to some place to eat,” said McCarty, 53, a retired Maryland state trooper.Not all of the once-monthly motorcycle worshipers are bikers, however, but all of the offerings – collected by passing a motorcycle helmet – are donated to local food banks, shelters and other human service agencies assisting the community.McCarty, who rides a Harley Davidson, says he has been able to make “good community” also by having a booth at local biker rallies. “People come by – people tattooed from knuckle to neck – and say they’ve tried to find a church that would take them, but that churches always told them to cover themselves up.“One guy told me that, ‘I’ve got tattoos, but my soul’s not tattooed. He asked for a blessing and I said yeah, I can do that.”He has become known as that “biker priest” and jokingly admits to sometimes speaking “Harley language.” Appearances may deceive, however; his beard and mustache often “throw people off,” added McCarty. “It’s funny. It gives me fodder for sermons sometimes, you know like, don’t judge.”For Geisler, having spent time in jail is “a good thing” for his motorcycle ministry because it makes him “much more human” to his flock, he says.The Pittsburgh native is a former steelworker and a former Roman Catholic priest, who was jailed during protests of the 1980s steel mill closings and loss of worker benefits and jobs. An Episcopal priest since 1999 and a biker for nearly 40 years, his ministry has grown because “bikers know other bikers.”Like McCarty, he says a church medal on his BMW motorcycle often arouses curiosity and leads to requests for pastoral care.“I am frequently contacted to do funerals for bikers who are alienated from church,” he said during a recent telephone interview with ENS. “I try to carry the public proclamation of the Gospel into their language.”Describing what hell would be like to mourners at a recent funeral, he said: “It’d be like you in the rain, completely alone with a motorcycle and you can’t get it started. But, you keep trying to kick-start it, but it won’t turn over and you’re just frustrated.”On the other hand, “heaven is a place where we’re all together as family and celebrating those things that we enjoy.”Geisler, and his congregation, are a series of contradictions. The church blends wealth and poverty, privilege and marginalization, the urban and suburban. “There are people here with education and wealth, and others with street smarts,” he says. “We have immigrants from Romania, refugees from the former Yugoslavia and a group from Ethiopia.”He officiates at an annual blessing of the bikes and also mentors new clergy, including the Rev. Frank Yesko, a psychologist and Harley enthusiast. Yesko was ordained June 15 and will begin serving as deacon-in-charge of St. Barnabas in Breckenridge, Pennsylvania in September.“It’s been an incredible journey,” said Yesko, 56, a community college psychology teacher, who acknowledged that Geisler’s mentorship fueled what might have been an unlikely path to ordination.“As I continued to grow and we got closer, I considered him my spiritual mentor or advisor,” he recalled. “I started getting active in the church, and it snowballed.”He views his motorcycle as “a vehicle to reach out. I try to be open-minded in terms of the opportunity to serve God,” he said.“I try not to rule out any possibilities. I believe serving God encompasses all of my life, including riding a motorcycle. Breaking down those stereotypes is a wonderful way to serve God.”‘Harley Hallelujahs’ in MississippiThe Rev. Ann Whitaker says she misses conducting biker masses now that she’s moved on from serving the Episcopal Church of the Creator in Clinton, Mississippi, to St. Peter’s Church in Oxford.“I think we’re missing something when we don’t offer it, there’s a lot of bikers out there,” she said during a recent telephone interview from Oxford.She isn’t a biker but took a 150-mile ride, to Vicksburg, on the back of one in 2008. It “reminded me of the Holy Spirit,” Whitaker recalled in a reflection she authored, titled “Harley Hallelujahs.”“At first, I simply wanted to grab the sidebars and hold on. I could not see over Pete Jr., or around him and certainly not through him. If I was going to enjoy the ride, I simply had to trust him to keep me safe,” she wrote.Her husband drove the entire way behind them in a car but “only once did I truly feel unsafe. A log truck coming from the opposite direction moved a mighty wind; later I laughed and said I was still pulling splinters out of my face,” she wrote. “It was amazing how different things smell on the back of a bike on the open road; you really smell the wood on those log trucks up close and personal! Riding into Vicksburg, we smelled bacon cooking along the road.”“I saw so many parallels in this place of where we have to trust God with every fiber of our being,” added Whitaker during a recent telephone interview with ENS. “I had to learn to not fight him. If he leaned to the right going around a curve I had to lean with him; otherwise we’d have wiped out.”The experience also raised issues about “how do we draw people in who are unchurched,” Whitaker said. “How do we draw people who might not sit in church ordinarily on Sunday morning and what do they have to say to us? It has a lot to say about how we meet God.”‘Blessing of the wheels’ on O’ahuOn Aug. 25, the Rev. Paul Klitzke blessed wheels of all sorts – skateboards, roller skates, bicycles, cars, vans, motorcycles, and even a walker – at St. Nicholas Church, Kapolei, in the Episcopal Diocese of Hawai’i.The 33-year-old Klitzke believes that, while his tattoos and Kawasaki Vulcan may “change the crowd and the dynamic at church some, mostly they open up the door for conversations with all kinds of people. It gives me the opportunity to meet people I wouldn’t otherwise meet.”He began riding motorcycles “because of a guy in my church” while serving in the Diocese of Alaska. “He told me if I took the basic rider course he’d lend me a bike to get me started.”He has tattoos of: a Jerusalem cross; a triquetra, symbolizing the Trinity; a tree of life, and a dove, representing the Holy Spirit. “Then this year I added around my cross, to symbolize the four gospels, the signs of the evangelist, a winged person, a winged ox, a winged lion and an eagle,” he said.Both his tattoos and his bike are often conversation-starters and stereotype-removers, he said.“Often, people are surprised to hear I’m a priest,” he recalled. “They talk to me because they like my tattoos or because I’m on a motorcycle. It’s a different sense of community, but when they ask about my tattoos they are asking about my relationship with God, and whether they intend to or not, it opens up a conversation about church and faith.Both help to dispel stereotypes.“The world stereotypes churchgoers and the world stereotypes people with tattoos and piercings and bikers,” Klitzke said.“But, when we twist those images, people with tattoos may have to rethink their presumptions about church and churches may have to rethink their presumptions about bikers and people with tattoos.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET August 29, 2013 at 10:00 am This is a wonderful article, and I am grateful to learn about this priestly ministry; yet I would have liked to learn more — about ways the ‘pew’ people and the bikers might find to be in genuine community with each other; about the special gifts bikers have to offer those of us using 4 wheels – for example, freedom from the idolatry of safety. Bikers’ gifts to their neighbors should be named, gratefully acknowledged and celebrated. It is not simply that the church could do more, but that, in failing to be intentional in our outreach to those who consider themselves not welcome, we also fail to honor their gifts and fail to benefit from them. What are the gifts that God is longing for us to receive from the underserved? Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing August 29, 2013 at 11:29 am I didn’t know this group of people is so disenfranchised from the church. Thanks for raising my awareness and blessings to the priests and others offering this ministry. Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 28, 2013 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments (5) This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Born to be ‘bikers’: Motorcycle ministries reach out to under-served Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA August 28, 2013 at 4:58 pm The Great Commission, in directing us to go into ‘all the world’ must have referenced both a geographic and social direction. The article mentions priests who surely embrace the idea of not only a plural society, and also a plural church family. Bikers at times have not been fully embraced by an element which considered itself more ‘mainstream,’ and at best regards ‘bikers’ with the quasi-charitable view that they are ‘OK in their place.’Those priests who are attending to bikers realize, as that great Bach chorale “We all worship one God proclaims, that we must go to the rich and the poor, and minister to the great diversity that comprises mankind. Thankfully, there are some among us who consider bikers worthy of the Kingdom of God, and thankfully the ‘Episcopal news’ regards their ministry as worthy of being publicized. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed.last_img read more

20 Jun

State of Racism in America: Much progress, much work remains

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release State of Racism in America: Much progress, much work remains Vigilance, advocacy for justice, connection with next generation seen as key AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments (4) November 15, 2013 at 9:32 pm In his book, Crazy Christians, Bishop Curry says, “All Are Welcome – No Exceptions”. Canon Tmothy Boggs, while at National Cathedral, defined, “Hospitality is not merely making space for somebody else, it’s about letting people into your hearts and letting them change you”. Jesus said, “Love one another as I have loved you” and he demonstrated it by his words and actions. Perhaps if we, as followers of Jesus, practiced Love, Welcome, and Hospitality each day, as well as in our churches, we might begin to see the kind of change we say we desire. “We do not think ourselves into new ways of living, we live ourselves into new ways of thinking.” -Richard Rohr – “When the power of love overcomes the love of power only then will the world know peace.” – Jimi Hendrix lyric Doing Love is more effective than Preaching Love. Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 15, 2013 Former Mississippi Governor William F. Winter responds to a question from State of Racism moderator Ray Suarez. Also participating in this first panel discussion are Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain civil-rights leader Medgar Evers, and Diocese of North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Jackson, Mississippi] Racism is ingrained in U.S. culture and, despite substantial progress, Americans must remain vigilant about their tendencies to exclude those they define as “the other,” agreed participants in the Nov. 15 opening session of “Fifty Years Later: The State of Racism in America,” a two-day gathering sponsored by the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Mississippi.Human history has seen a “lurching expansion” of the categories that previous generations used to define and then exclude, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said in her keynote address.“There is good news in the increased crossing of old boundaries; there is hope in the shrinking ability of younger generations to recognize those boundaries,” she said. “Yet continued vigilance is required, beginning with our own interior lives.”How, she asked, does one encounter a stranger and make assumptions that influence how one decides to interact with the person?Saying “the human heart is larger than the fences we build between us,” Jefferts Schori defined vigilance as “an essential spiritual discipline linked to the examination of conscience and repentance.”“Learn vigilance,” she concluded. “Teach and work for justice that we might become the beloved community of God’s rainbow people. Every family, language, people and nation gathered before the lamb, himself one of the lowly and rejected. Dream that world into being here on the earth, and drive out hell to bring it to birth.”Earlier this week the Episcopal Church released the results of a poll on perceptions of racial discrimination that it commissioned from Harris Interactive. The poll found that nearly all Americans (98 percent) feel that there is at least some discrimination in the United States today. Yet, more than eight in 10 agree that in the future, Americans will be more accepting of all races, the poll found.The gathering in Jackson is taking place as the U.S. has marked or will soon mark the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, and the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Medgar Evers, a WWII veteran and civil rights activist who was killed in the driveway of his Jackson, Mississippi, home on June 12, 1963.It’s hard for Americans to talk about racism, said moderator Ray Suarez, former PBS chief national correspondent who recently joined Al-Jazeera America.“Attempts to speak simply and directly about why and when race matters and when it does not are dismissed as playing the race card, and the speaker dismissed as a race hustler,” he told the gathering.Suarez added that Americans also “have a hard time talking about progress – even striking, substantial, undeniable progress – because the weight of so much remaining to be done is with us all the time.”The 90-minute program was webcast live from the Diocese of Mississippi’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson, where 350 people registered to attend. Another 300 locations connected to the webcast as members of many dioceses, congregations, seminaries and other groups gathered across the United States to watch, some using a discussion guide developed for the forum.The webcast will be available for on-demand viewing here soon.Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain civil-rights leader Medgar Evers, greets two participants in the Nov. 15 State of Racism gathering at the Diocese of Mississippi’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceJournalist Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of Medgar Evers, told the gathering during a panel discussion on the state of racism today that racism “flows in the veins of America.”“How do we eliminate it? Do we eliminate it, or will there have to be continuous efforts to lower the level of racism here?” she asked.Getting young people involved – helping them learn history and listening to their ideas for a better world – is key, Evers-Williams said. “We have to instill within their hearts and minds that this is not the way we should be as human beings,” she said.On a day when the local Clarion-Ledger newspaper called former Mississippi Governor William F. Winter a leader who brings “honor [and] nobility” to politics, the 90-year-old Winter said the only way to make progress against racism is by having “honest discussions” such as the State of Racism forum and by “bringing up those questions that we would rather not face.”Winter, the founder of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation, also pointed to young people and said he supports efforts “to invest them with the commitment to create a better society and understand that where they are now – as far as we’ve come – where they are now still leaves so many unfulfilled opportunities for so many young people.”“We must instill in a new generation of Southerners and Americans the obligation – the duty – not to succumb to skepticism and the cynicism that is abroad in the land but to accept fully the blessings that come from being citizens of this country and having access to all of the opportunities and resources that make for a meaningful life.”Diocese of North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry likened the state of racism in the U.S. to addiction, noting that addicts who recognize their problem never say that they are no longer addicted; they say that they are recovering.“The reason we have to have this conversation is that there are people denying that we are addicted. We are addicted in many ways to racial patterns and [other] patterns of exclusion that harm the children of God,” Curry said. “At one time they may have been more explicit; now they are more subtle and so you can have a black man in the White House … and yet you can have voter-suppression laws being passed in many states in the United States to this day.”Racism must be battled as a Christian battles sin, he said, by summoning the moral courage to name it, oppose it and then “seek to bring the better angels of all of our natures to play to overcome that.”During a second panel discussion, this one considering whether there is hope for change in America’s future, Massachusetts State Rep. Byron Rushing, who is also a civil-rights leader and vice president of the Episcopal Church’s House of Deputies, argued that “racism is an invention; that racism is cultural … it is learned.”Massachusetts State Rep. Byron Rushing, a civil-rights leader and vice president of the Episcopal Church’s House of Deputies, tells State of Racism moderator Ray Suarez that Episcopalians must  be countercultural to counter racism. Listening are Randy Testa, vice president of education at Walden Media; White Earth Band of Ojibwe Chairwoman Erma J. Vizenor and educator and author Tim Wise. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“We’re not here to try to get people to stop being prejudiced; we assume that everybody has that under control,” he said to some laughter from the audience. “What we’re trying to say is how do we as Christians, as a particular group of Christians – Episcopalians – take on the culture? How do we become countercultural?”People who want to change that culture “have to blow up racism,” Rushing said.“But I don’t know how you blow up racism in a country of 312 million people where almost nobody cops to being a racist,” Suarez countered.Rushing said people have to be intentional and vigilant “so that all, all aspects of racism that appear, whether they are minor or major, get commented on.”Massachusetts state Rep. Byron Rushing, a civil-rights leader and vice president of the Episcopal Church’s House of Deputies, left, speaks Nov. 15 with the Rev. Mark Stevenson, Episcopal Church missioner for domestic poverty, after the opening session of the State of Racism gathering at the Diocese of Mississippi’s St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in downtown Jackson. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceLater when Suarez asked each panelist to describe their sense of the future for America and its racism, Rushing said he was optimistic but convinced that institutions must lead the way. For instance, the Episcopal Church has been working against racism for decades and Rushing said to applause: “Let us just get two-and-half-million people being anti-racist.”During that second panel discussion, White Earth Band of Ojibwe Chairwoman Erma J. Vizenor noted that indigenous people used to form the majority in what is now the U.S. Now there are 566 nations and 5.2 million Native Americans who make up 1.7 percent of the U.S. population “and yet we are so invisible.”“When we talk about racism, seldom are Native Americans mentioned,” she said.Native Americans carry their history with them in a unique way, Vizenor said, and “if we have suffered trauma, discrimination, prejudice, that revisits us many, many times in our lifetime.”“We need to focus on reconciliation … and develop strategies to heal and reconcile,” she said.Despite the fact that the U.S. “has failed to acknowledge the truth” about what it did to indigenous people, Vizenor said she was optimistic about the future.“I believe in the goodness of people,” she said.Randy Testa, vice president of education at Walden Media, said the future depends on children hearing the stories of the civil rights movement and other efforts to eliminate prejudice. “For kids in particular … a powerful story first of all affords complexity, allows them to feel as well as think,” he said.Responding to Suarez’s question about the future, educator Tim Wise, author of Colorblind, White Like Me and Affirmative Action, said that he is an optimist “because I am alive; there is no other choice but to give up” and giving up would impose too great a burden on the children and grandchildren.The gathering continues Nov. 16 when faith leaders and educators will gather at the cathedral to discuss the topics raised in the Nov. 15 forum and create curriculum and tools.A related bibliography and other resources are available here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing November 15, 2013 at 10:31 pm This issue of racism/prejudice is right here in our face,right now. Immigration rights, basically human rights of the hispanic/latino peoples here right now in our country–and held hostage, in gridlock in the U.S. Congress. Is the Church, Episcopal and other denominations, supporting and facilitating this critical issue w/dialogue face-to-face w/legislators and congressional members who have the power and inflluence to honor the basic human rights which all peoples must have-Yet some Congressional members wish to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico similar to the wall built by Israel in the Palestinian lands. And at the same time similar to this comparison deny basic constitutional/human rights of life, liberty and some basic freedom of movement and penalize peoples who have been living in the U.S. or thePalestinians denial of access to their own land and opportunities for their children for health, education and ability to sustain life itself. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. Rector Bath, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service State of Racism Dianne Aid, TSSF says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Dr. Erna Lund says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Rector Smithfield, NC November 15, 2013 at 9:13 pm It is happy news that TEC is willing to confront the issue of racism directly and openly. It is good to deal with the issue in the southern states but we must not ignore the the problem of racism in the rest of the nation. Both Church members and Political Representatives practice some degree of racism. It is time to end this negative social malady. I would add also that our negative view of women should be terminated. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Raymond Hoche-Mong says: Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Gerard A. Pisani, Jr + says: November 16, 2013 at 1:07 am I really appreciated what I have read here. I ask, please, please, please to keep the conversation alive and moving so we can redeem, heal, partner and move forward as the community in the Episcopal Church, and reach beyond our walls as well. I am so grateful for Byron and others who can speak the truth with such grace. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

20 Jun

Funeral arrangements set for Executive Council member Terry Star

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Funeral arrangements set for Executive Council member Terry Star Police say seminarian died of heart attack at Nashotah House This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 7, 2014 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Star, whose council term would have ended after General Convention in 2015, was also a convention deputy. He belonged to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (http://www.standingrock.org/). Star served as a deacon for the Standing Rock Episcopal Community (http://www.standingrockepiscopal.org/).In November, Star preached at the consecration of the new St. James building (https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2013/11/25/sioux-episcopalians-celebrate-new-church-arisen-out-of-arsonists-ashes/), which replaced the church that was destroyed by an arsonist in July 2012. A video recording of his sermon is here (https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2013/11/25/video-terry-star-preaches-at-consecration-of-st-james-cannon-ball/).— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”;} Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Terry Star will be buried out of his home church of St. James Episcopal Church in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on March 10.Meanwhile, the City of Delafield, Wisconsin, police department and the Waukesha County Medical Examiner have concluded that Star, a 40 year-old deacon in the Diocese of North Dakota and a member of the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council, died March 4 of a heart attack.Star was found in his lodgings at Nashotah House Theological Seminary, where he was studying for ordination to the priesthood.After he did not attend chapel that morning of March 4 and failed to show up for classes or meals, a member of the Nashotah House community went to check on Star, said the Rev. Canon John Floberg, a fellow member of the Diocese of North Dakota and also an Executive Council member.Delafield Police Chief Erik Kehl told Episcopal News Service that police officers and members of the local fire department responded to a call from the seminary at 7:40 p.m. March 4. They found Star in his apartment and attempted to revive him.Those present “determined he was past aid, so we began a death investigation and called the medical examiner’s office,” Kehl said.Such an investigation is routine for most unattended deaths in Wisconsin. “It’s more going through the investigative process, trying to recreate the previous day or so of Mr. Star’s life,” Kehl explained.The investigation included an autopsy that was conducted on Ash Wednesday. Kehl was present for the autopsy.The investigation revealed nothing suspicious about Star’s death, Kehl said.A wake for Star with a prayer service will be held at St. James during the evening of March 9.Star will be buried at Red Hail’s Camp at St. Gabriel’s Camp in Solen, North Dakota, where he served as a youth minister and camp director for many years. A meal will follow Star’s burial at the Red Gym in the middle of Cannon Ball, which is on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation.Red Hail, a Sioux warrior who donated land so that a church could be built among his people, was Star’s maternal great-great-grandfather, according to information posted on St. James’ Facebook page. Red Hail fought at the Battle of Greasy Grass, which also is known as the Battle of the Little Big Horn.The St. Gabriel’s church that was built on Red Hail’s donated land burned in 1970, and the congregation joined St. James in Cannon Ball. The land at Solen grew into a church camp in the mid-1990s. The camp has been the site of the Diocese of North Dakota’s training of local members for ordained ministry. Seven, including Star, were trained there and later were ordained.Star, whose council term would have ended after General Convention in 2015, was also a convention deputy. He belonged to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. Star served as a deacon for the Standing Rock Episcopal Community.In November, Star preached at the consecration of the new St. James building, which replaced the church that was destroyed by an arsonist in July 2012. A video recording of his sermon is here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service.Funeral service set for Executive Council member Terry StarPolice say Star died of heart attack at Nashotah House where he was a studentBy Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Terry Star will be buried out of his home church of St. James Episcopal Church in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on March 10.Meanwhile, the City of Delafield, Wisconsin, police department and the Waukesha County Medical Examiner have concluded that Star, a 40 year-old deacon in the Diocese of North Dakota and a member of the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council (http://www.generalconvention.org/ec), died March 4 of a heart attack.Star was found (https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2014/03/05/deacon-terry-star-executive-council-member-found-dead-at-seminary) in his lodgings at Nashotah House Theological Seminary (http://nashotah.edu), where he was studying for ordination to the priesthood.After he did not attend chapel that morning of March 4 and failed to show up for classes or meals, a member of the Nashotah House community went to check on Star, said the Rev. Canon John Floberg, a fellow member of the Diocese of North Dakota and also an Executive Council member.Delafield Police Chief Erik Kehl told Episcopal News Service that police officers and members of the local fire department responded to a call from the seminary at 7:40 p.m. March 4. They found Star in his apartment and attempted to revive him.Those present “determined he was past aid, so we began a death investigation and called the medical examiner’s office,” Kehl said.Such an investigation is routine for most unattended deaths in Wisconsin. “It’s more going through the investigative process, trying to recreate the previous day or so of Mr. Star’s life,” Kehl explained.The investigation included an autopsy that was conducted on Ash Wednesday. Kehl was present for the autopsy.The investigation revealed nothing suspicious about Star’s death, Kehl said.A wake for Star with a prayer service will be held at St. James during the evening of March 9.Star will be buried at Red Hail’s Camp at St. Gabriel’s Camp (http://www.ndepiscopal.org/welcome/st-gabriels-camp-solen/) in Solen, North Dakota, where he served as a youth minister and camp director for many years. A meal will follow Star’s burial at the Red Gym in the middle of Cannon Ball, which is on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation.Red Hail, a Sioux warrior who donated land so that a church could be built among his people, was Star’s maternal great-great-grandfather, according to information posted (https://www.facebook.com/StJamesCannonBall/posts/669086399804015?stream_ref=10) on St. James’ Facebook page. Red Hail fought at the Battle of Greasy Grass (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Little_Bighorn), which also is known as the Battle of the Little Big Horn.The St. Gabriel’s church that was built on Red Hail’s donated land burned in 1970, and the congregation joined St. James in Cannon Ball. The land at Solen grew into a church camp in the mid-1990s. The camp has been the site of the Diocese of North Dakota’s training of local members for ordained ministry. Seven, including Star, were trained there and later were ordained. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

20 Jun

Rapidísimas

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Juan David Alvarado, sacerdote salvadoreño de 52 años de edad, ha sido electo obispo diocesano de El Salvador el 23 de agosto en la segunda votación de una asamblea diocesana formada por clérigos y laicos electos por sus parroquias o misiones.  La asamblea tenía cinco candidatos incluyendo a una mujer, Lee Alison Crawford de la diócesis de Vermont. Alvarado nació literalmente en la Iglesia de San Juan Evangelista donde su madre, Blanca Melgar, estaba encargada de cuidar los edificios. El obispo electo y su esposa Irma, ordenada presbítera, tienen dos hijos. La Iglesia Episcopal Anglicana de El Salvador forma parte de la provincia eclesiástica de Centro América conocida por IARCA. En este cargo sucede a Martín Barahona que se jubila por razones de edad. La consagración del obispo electo tendrá lugar el 24 de enero del 2015.El Vaticano ha quitado la inmunidad diplomática al anterior nuncio apostólico (embajador) en la República Dominicana, el ex-arzobispo polaco Josef Wesolowki, acusado de abusar sexualmente de niños y jóvenes durante su estadía en el país caribeño. Analistas jurídicos en Santo Domingo sugieren que sea traído para que los tribunales locales decidan la pena que debe recibir. Un periódico dice que debe expiar su delito en una de las cárceles conocida por las malas condiciones prevalentes.El cese al fuego entre Israel y los palestinos destinado a terminar el conflicto de Gaza que ya tiene siete semanas, parece que está dando resultados. Ninguna de las partes ha “cantado victoria”. Israel dijo que destruyó los túneles que servían de depósito de armas. Las bajas en el lado palestino pasan de miles. El alto al fuego que fue negociado en El Cairo, Egipto, y no tiene fecha de expiración.El gobierno de China ha reaccionado cautelosamente a las palabras del papa Francisco sobre relaciones diplomáticas con China. Beijing dijo en un despacho de prensa que “no queremos interferencia con las cuestiones religiosas en China”. Los católicos romanos en China están divididos entre la iglesia “oficial” conocida como la Asociación Católica Patriótica dependiente del Partido Comunista y la iglesia subterránea dependiente de Roma.El obispo anglicano Desmond Tutu y su hija la presbítera Mpho Tutu acaban de publicar un libro  que promete tener éxito llamado “El libro del perdón” en el que se ofrecen simples acciones para lograr el perdón de una persona ofendida. El libro consta de cuatro secciones: Contar la historia, Explicar la ofensa, Ofrecer el perdón y Renovar las relaciones.El papa Francisco dijo en su viaje de regreso a Roma después de visitar a Corea del Sur que “no hay impedimento alguno” en el proceso de beatificación del arzobispo salvadoreño Oscar Arnulfo Romero asesinado mientras celebraba la eucaristía el 24 de marzo de 1980. El papa añadió que el asunto ya está en manos de la Congregación para la Causa de los Santos del Vaticano. Romero dijo poco antes de su asesinato “si me matan, resucitaré en el pueblo salvadoreño”.No sólo las casas y las calles están deteriorándose en Cuba. Uno de los baluartes de la revolución el cantautor Silvio Rodríguez dijo recientemente que las grabaciones del estudio Abdala creado por su iniciativa en 1998, “agoniza” ante las trabas burocráticas y la inoperancia  de funcionarios del Ministerio de Cultura. Rodríguez es el fundador de “La Nueva Trova”. Añadió que la situación es tan sería que no hay ni electricidad por falta de pago. “Me da vergüenza ver los estudios en ruinas”, añadió el popular cantante.Si usted conoce alguna persona que le gustaría leer un noticiero como éste, mándenos su dirección electrónica y con gusto lo incluiremos en nuestra lista. El servicio es totalmente gratis. Gracias.REFRÁN: A caballo regalao no se le mira el colmillo. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Por Onell A. SotoPosted Aug 27, 2014 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rapidísimas Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

20 Jun

Nations, interfaith community reaffirm commitment to cut carbon emissions

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel By Lynette Wilson Posted Nov 21, 2016 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Greenpeace stages a protest outside the UN Climate Change Conference 2016 (COP22) in Marrakesh, Morocco, Nov. 18, 2016. PHOTO: Youssef Boudlal/REUTERS[Episcopal News Service] Nations worldwide convened Nov. 7-18 in Marrakesh, Morocco, to hammer out the details of the Paris Agreement in a shift toward implementation and action on climate and sustainable development.“Our climate is warming at an alarming and unprecedented rate and we have an urgent duty to respond,” reads the Marrakesh Action Proclamation for Our Climate and Sustainable Development issued at the close of the 22nd Conference fo the Parties (COP22) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.“We welcome the Paris Agreement … its rapid entry into force, with its ambitious goals, its inclusive nature and its reflection of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances, and we affirm our commitment to its full implementation.”In December 2015, world governments and officials met in France to reach a historic agreement to reduce carbon emissions and arrest global warming. Since then, 111 countries, including the United States have signed the Paris Agreement, which went into effect on Nov. 4.The agreement calls on the countries of the world to limit carbon emissions, which will require a decrease in dependence on fossil fuels in favor of renewable energy sources; and for developed countries, those responsible for the majority of emissions both historically and at present, to commit to $100 billion in development aid annually by 2020 to developing countries.The proclamation calls for strong solidarity with those countries most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change; for all parties to strengthen and support efforts to eradicate poverty, ensure food security and to take stringent action to deal with climate change challenges in agriculture; to close the gap between current emissions trajectories and the pathway needed to meet the long-term temperature goals of the Paris Agreement; and for an increase in the volume, flow and access to finance for climate projects, alongside improved capacity and technology, including from developed to developing countries.“The Marrakesh Proclamation declares ‘irreversible momentum on climate,’ we now pray and discern our way to take part in this momentum,” said California Bishop Marc Andrus, who attended the United Nations climate conference in Marrakesh as an Episcopal delegate representing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry.“The Episcopal Church has an ecumenical and interfaith stance that impels us to work on building vibrant relationships with other denominations of Christianity and with other religions – again, we can ask what this diverse, complicated and increasingly integrated set of relationships offers to climate action.”An interfaith climate statement signed by close to 300 religious leaders from 50 countries was presented Nov. 16 to a member of the U.N. Secretary General’s Climate Change Support Team. The interfaith statement calls on nations to justly manage the transition to a low carbon economy and urges governments to shift trillions of dollars of investments in fossil fuels into renewable energy, goals in line with the Paris Agreement and the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals.The United States is the world’s largest economy and its second largest emitter of greenhouse gasses, which trap heat in the atmosphere and make the planet warmer.The Nov. 8 election of Donald J. Trump as the next U.S. president cast a pall over the climate conference, as he has vowed to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Agreement and curb the country’s commitment to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels. The president-elect has called human-caused climate change a “hoax.”“In the first week, the general pulse of the COP gathering was one of shock, denial, grief and anguish when the results of the U.S. elections became known. It was characterized by gloom, even tears, as many felt that the hard work that had been done was just about to go down the tubes,” said Lynnaia Main, global partnerships officer for the Episcopal Church and its liaison to the United Nations, who also attended the conference on behalf of the presiding bishop.The mood, however, began to change at the start of the second week, she said, “we began to hear signs of hope and reaffirmation of the willingness to remain together and push forward on climate action.”For instance, said Main, faith-based groups in attendance at the conference pledged to continue their work, with a focus on city and state governments and at the global level; while continuing to engage with the U.S. government.“These smaller actors have the potential to make big strides in curbing emissions, and as advocates, we can plug into this potential through urging local structures to play their part in the international climate effort,” said Jayce Hafner, the Episcopal Church’s domestic policy analyst based in Washington, D.C., and a member of Curry’s delegation.On Nov. 16, major corporations and investors called on President Barack Obama and president-elect Trump, to continue low-carbon policies and investments, and to stay committed to the Paris Agreement.On Nov. 18, Trump announced three cabinet picks, all on the record as climate deniers. That same day, some of the world’s poorest countries strengthened their pledges to move toward renewables to meet 100 percent of their energy needs.For its part, the Episcopal Church engages in environmental and climate justice advocacy using as a basis resolutions passed by the Church’s General Convention and its Executive Council, which in 2008 adopted support for the Church’s long-term carbon neutral goals.The 2015 General Convention passed legislation to create a task force on climate change, which will provide resources that parishes can use to “green” their churches and educate members on what they can do to address climate change in their everyday lives.“As the Episcopal Church mobilized in the early years of this century to embrace and forward the United Nations goals to reduce extreme poverty globally, so we can work in partnership with non-governmental organizations and governmental bodies to create a sustainable world,” said Andrus, at the close of the climate conference in Marrakesh.“The Episcopal Church has enormous resources – chief among them are what [Holocaust survivor and filmmaker] Pierre Sauvage called ‘weapons of the spirit’ – prayer and our spiritual values, the sacraments, the Scriptures, the Body of the faithful, and the Holy Spirit. All of these spiritual realities inform and support our action in the world – finance, advocacy, ‘greening the Church,’ resistance, solidarity, protest.”Many Episcopal churches have installed solar panels. And this year, Church Divinity School of the Pacific installed the largest solar panel grid of any theological institution in the country.The Diocese of North Dakota is working on an energy sustainability project in its seven native ministries and congregations, including churches on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, near where protesters have for more the six months opposed construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near the tribe’s water supply and sacred sites. Andrus recently joined more than 540 clergy and lay leaders in a day of solidarity and witness with the Standing Rock Sioux Nation near Cannon Ball, North Dakota.– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Environment & Climate Change Rector Belleville, IL Ronald Davin says: November 21, 2016 at 5:29 pm So, does this mean that our refrigerators and airconditioners may not be taken away, as John Kerry suggested ? AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis November 21, 2016 at 8:15 pm While Bishop Andrus babblessed people walk away from a secular body playing church finding is clergy shallow secular and boring. Nations, interfaith community reaffirm commitment to cut carbon emissions Interfaith leaders from 50 countries sign climate statement Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments (2) Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Advocacy Peace & Justice, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Donald Heacock says: Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA last_img read more

20 Jun

‘Lesser Feasts and Fasts’ a step closer to revision

first_img Featured Events July 14, 2018 at 2:10 am History repeating itself. The pale reflection is becoming paler. [Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] It was a long and winding road, but the 79th General Convention has committed to revising “Lesser Feasts and Fasts” and the entire sanctoral calendar with the adoption of resolution A065.The journey began in the Standing Commission on Liturgy in Music. The 2015 General Convention sent the SCLM 11 resolutions related to the church’s various lists of saints that it has chosen to remember and honor. Those resolutions, along with feedback from the church, led the committee to decide that it ought to prepare a new edition of “Lesser Feasts and Fasts,” which would better reflect the diversity of the church and could work in conjunction with “A Great Cloud of Witnesses,” which the 2015 General Convention voted to “make available” but did not authorize.Full ENS coverage of the 79th meeting of General Convention is available here.(“Lesser Feasts and Fasts” is a collection of proper collects, lessons and psalms for the Eucharist on each of the weekdays of Lent, each of the weekdays of the Easter season, and each of the lesser feasts of the church year. It is used in addition to the major feasts and saints included in the Book of Common Prayer.)The Blue Book Report filed by the SCLM contains the recommended revisions to “Lesser Feasts and Fasts” to make the calendar of commemorations less confusing and more diverse. It is 650 pages long.The resolution resulting from the report, A065, worked its way through the legislative process of General Convention from the first (unofficial) day of convention, July 4, to the last, July 13. There were a few detours along the way.Hearings in the Committee for Prayer Book, Liturgy and Music, chaired by Atlanta Bishop J. Neil Alexander for the House of Bishops and the Rev. Susan Anslow Williams of Michigan for the House of Deputies, were held the morning of July 4. People testified, mostly about adding or deleting a particular person or requesting that a person be moved from one resource to another. Learn more here.A legislative subcommittee working solely on revisions to “Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018” substituted new language in the resolution to combine the proposed “Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018,” “A Great Cloud of Witnesses” (2015) and “Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2006” into one calendar for use during the 2018-2021 triennium.But a move in the House of Deputies to revert to the SCLM version of A065 brought debate to a halt until July 12.The Rev. Jack Zamboni, deputy from New Jersey, and a member of the legislative committee, spoke against the amendment. “One of the challenges for the committee, they also included a secondary calendar within that book that left us with tiers A and B, and it was the sense of the committee to get rid of tiers.”The Rev. Scott Gunn, deputy from Southern Ohio, spoke in favor of the amendment. He asked for the house to accept the Blue Book report of SCLM [as the resolution]. “During this 2018 Lent Madness summit to choose the saints, [they] spent a lot of time with the calendar. These are worthy saints, a balanced calendar, not a perfect calendar, but that this why we have an ongoing revision process,” he said.In the end, the House of Deputies agreed to go back to the SCLM’s recommended text, and both houses approved the resolution near the end of convention on the morning of July 13.Moving into the next triennium, “Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2006” is still in use; “Great Cloud of Witnesses 2015” is also still available for use; and the new commemorations in “Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018” are authorized for trial use. The SCLM was told to provide “the 80th General Convention with a clear and unambiguous plan for a singular calendar of ‘Lesser Feasts and Fasts.’”— Sharon Tillman is a freelance writer for Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Liturgy & Music Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL R H Lewis VTS1963 says: Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis General Convention 2018, Rector Belleville, IL Tags General Convention, Rector Bath, NC Frank Harrision says: Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Jewels Wolf says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Sharon TillmanPosted Jul 13, 2018 Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest July 13, 2018 at 8:32 pm Once again I suggest that those who are interested in revising, expanding, etc, the Prayer Bool read this article:http://www.episcopalnet.org/TRACTS/Deceived.htmlI take it that soon you will be headed home. Have a safe journey.Pax — Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ ‘Lesser Feasts and Fasts’ a step closer to revision July 13, 2018 at 6:52 pm I seem to recall the Revd Dr Chas P Price saying that we (Episcopalians) go in phases. Ex- pand and expand. Then, it’s too large and cumbersome, so we pare it back to basics. We are in an inflationary time. Many adds are needed and valid, other – not so much. Right now we over-expnded and need some reductions, some winnowing. R H Lewis Comments are closed. Comments (3) Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more