4 Aug

Rancic Comes to Red Bank

first_imgBy Tom PaolellaEditor’ Note: The Two River Times™ is a 2012 sponsor of “Paint the Town Pink,” an initiative presented by Riverview Medical Center to encourage annual mammography. Each week through May 12, the TRT™ will feature stories and blogs provided by Riverview Medical Center to encourage women 40 and older to have their annual mammograms.As many of you are aware, the theme of this year’s Paint the Town Pink is “Men in Pink.” For 2012, the Pink communities have gotten to know several of the men who have supported Paint the Town Pink over the years such as Mark Arnone, the man behind the “Pink line” and Bob McKay, the man behind the “Pink lens.”Breast cancer is traditionally thought of as a “woman’s issue” – and, by and large, it is. Yet that doesn’t mean a breast cancer diagnosis only affects women. In reality, the disease also impacts men, whether it’s their spouse, sibling, relative, or friend who’s battling it. As supporters of Paint the Town Pink who promote the importance of annual mammography, thousands of men over the past five years have made it their mission to get the word out about annual mammography and help others support the women in their lives.Bill Rancic, author, entrepreneur and husband, will share his story of career, family and his wife’s breast cancer diagnosis.A new supporter of Paint the Town Pink for this year is Bill Rancic. You may remember him as the first winner on television’s “The Apprentice,” or maybe you have come to love him as one half of the Giuliana and Bill duo on the Style Network. Whichever the case, you won’t want to miss a Paint the Town Pink exclusive coming up in just a few short days. Meridian Cancer Care in conjunction with Paint the Town Pink is excited to host a special event titled “An Unplanned Plan: An Evening with Bill Rancic.”This will be an evening to remember at 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 7 at the Count Basie Theatre in “Pink Bank” for an evening with Bill, author, entrepreneur, and husband. Bill will candidly share his story of his marriage and family, his career, and his wife’s recent breast cancer diagnosis, and all the unplanned things in life that happen when you are busy making other plans.There are still tickets for sale through the Count Basie Theatre Box Office. General admission tickets are only $39. Also don’t miss the special VIP premium tickets for $100, which includes premium seating at the event, a meet and greet cocktail reception with Bill Rancic immediately following the event, and a special Paint the Town Pink gift bag. Order your tickets online at www.CountBasie Theatre.org or by phone at 732-842-9000.Paint the Town Pink 2012 runs from May 4-12. For more information about Paint the Town Pink visit the website at www.PainttheTownPink.com and be sure to follow Paint the Town Pink on Facebook to see highlights of this year’s campaign and for a complete list of events and activities.last_img read more

4 Aug

About Town

first_imgRUMSONEdith Frankel, political scientist, professor and author, will speak at 11:15 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 13, at Congregation B’nai Israel. Frankel will be speaking about her new book, Old Lives and New: Soviet Immigrants in Israel and America. The book is the story of individuals who made the difficult and sometimes hazardous decision to leave their home, family and friends and start new lives in the U.S. and Israel. Their experiences – from their formative years in the Soviet Union to their decisions to leave and their struggles to receive permission to emigrate – illuminate the complex history of Soviet Jews.Frankel is a political scientist who has published widely on the Soviet Union and Soviet Jews. She is the author of Navy Mir: A case study of the politics of literature 1952-1958 as well as studies on the ethnic Germans of the Soviet Union, the Revolutions of 1917, the Soviet treatment of Jews and Soviet Jewish voting patterns in Israel. She has also taught at the Hebrew University of Jersuralem and Dartmouth College, Stanford University and University College London.Founded in 1922, Congre­gation B’nai Israel is affiliated with United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism. It is located at 171 Ridge Road.The program, cosponsored by the Adult Education and Ezra committees, is free and open to the public. Bagels and coffee will be served. Following the program, books will be available for sale and Frankel will have a book signing. ATLANTIC HIGHLANDSThe Atlantic Highlands Arts Council is celebrating its fifth anniversary in its new space with a new exhibit and a grand opening and reception.In 2013, the arts council will open its new office at the Finelines Building, 21 W. Lincoln St. The public is invited from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11, to the free opening and reception with refreshments from Memphis Pig Out. An exhibition of painting by borough resident Claire Mittermann will be featured.The all-volunteer arts council brings a broad array of cultural activities to Atlantic Highlands. With strong community support, the arts council has for five years produced concerts, an arts camp for children, PaintOut!, artists lectures, exhibitions, FilmOneFest, and much more, all without employees or space.Additional information is available by visiting www.atlantichighlandsartscouncil.org or calling 732-737-7160. LONG BRANCHNJ Repertory is looking for volunteers from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 5, help clean up the cottage at 311 Liberty St. The day will consist of taking down drywall, ripping up carpet and cleaning up yard debris left by Super Storm Sandy. Those who can help are asked to wear warm clothes that they don’t mind getting dirty, work-type shoes, heavy work gloves, hammers and crowbars if you have them.The more people who can help, the easier it will be to start restoring the cottage to its former self. Any time people can volunteer that day will be greatly appreciated. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Those who can help are asked to contact cleanup organizers to let them know how many to expect at: njrep@njrep.org FAIR HAVENProject Animal Worldwide (PAW) invites the community to a Sweet Beginning: Dessert Party and Wine Tasting from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, Jan. 18, at Raven and the Peach, located at 740 River Road.The evening will feature light fare and scrumptious desserts, including a chocolate fountain to ring in the New Year, as well as more than 40 gift auction baskets, a jewelry bar from Barking Blue Jay and a wine tasting presented in the restaurant’s beautiful wine cellar.Admission is $30 per person. An additional fee of $15 is requested to participate in the wine tasting. Registration is requested by Jan. 11. Tickets may be purchased at www.projectanimal.org or by calling Ellen LaTorre at 732-979-6499.Event proceeds directly support the work of Project Animal Worldwide.“Please join us as we celebrate the beginning of a new year with new hopes for the future as PAW continues to focus on helping dogs and cats through humane education, rescue and the need for spay and neuter to prevent unwanted animal overpopulation,” said LaTorre, acting president, Project Animal Worldwide. “We were very proud to be able to carry out our mission this year in our own backyard, helping the feral kittens in Sea Bright, N.J., when Super Storm Sandy hit our shores. We hope that people will put aside the daily stress and treat themselves to the sweeter things in life for an evening, all in the name of helping animals.” TINTON FALLSThe Jersey Shore Rose Society, an affiliate of the American Rose Society, will hold a meeting on Jan. 26, in the community room at Kensington Court Assisted Living, 864 Shrewsbury Ave.The meeting will feature a beginner clinic from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. conducted by Consulting Rosarians. The main meeting will be held from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. The topic will be about the Heritage Rose District of New York City with speaker Stephen Scanniello, president, Heritage Rose Foundation.last_img read more

4 Aug

Sea Bright Restaurateur Has Plans For Lot

first_imgAt a June 8 public information meeting at which county engineers explained the proposals for the bridge, for which construction is planned to begin in 2020, officials said the former Sunoco lot was essential for the plan to provide for left turns onto and off Ocean Avenue as well as for parking since state regulations do not permit left turns in or out of Old Rumson Road, which is just south of Dunkin’ Donuts and Oar Fitness.Bonfiglio on Tuesday said he had met with county representatives about the lot to discuss “how could we work together and make it work.”Under discussion, he said, was perhaps having dual use of the former Sunoco lot, and having Tommy’s use a portion of Old Rumson Road for his parking lot access.Bonfiglio said that the use of the lot for Dunkin’ Donuts and Tommy’s could work out since his restaurant would use the lot mostly from noon to midnight while Dunkin’ Donuts parking was mostly from 6 to 11 a.m.He said the plans for the bridge were “still just talk,” and “not final yet.”Bonfiglio questioned if the county would seek to take over his lot. “It would be hard to take parking from one person to give to another,” he said. By Liz SheehanSEA BRIGHT– A lot on Ocean Avenue, formerly the site of a Sunoco station, located north of Tommy’s Tap and Tavern, is an integral – and possible conflicting – part of future plans both for the restaurant and for Monmouth County’s proposed relocation of the bridge which connects the borough and Rumson.Tommy Bonfiglio, the owner of the restaurant, wants to use the parking lot for 26 new parking spaces for his business. He said he owns the lot.Bonfiglio has applied to the Sea Bright Unified Planning Board to use an upstairs room in his building for private parties for up to 70 people and would use some of the spaces in the Sunoco lot to cover a portion of the parking spots required for this plan, according to C. Lance Cunningham, the chairman of the planning board.Asked if the board had taken into account that the county has designated the same parking lot for use for access to and parking for Dunkin’ Donuts and Oar Fitness, which will lose their present parking areas when the bridge is moved slightly to the south, Cunningham said “we have to deal with what’s before” the board.“Right now the county doesn’t own it, Tommy’s does,” he said, referring to the lot.The board heard Bonfiglio’s application on July 12 and will have a future hearing on the matter.last_img read more

4 Aug

Mapping History in Red Bank

first_img“We’d like to do more. We’d like to have more historical tours – artists, writers. These are things we’re going to work on. We need more people to actually do the tours.” Growing up on Oakland Street, Colmorgen remembers hearing the cadence as soldiers drilled in the National Guard Armory on Chestnut Street, now an ice hockey rink. Winters, she would skate on Mohawk pond, near what is now Count Basie field, or race across the frozen river from the foot of Front Street to Marine Park, leaping over the holes eel fishermen had cut into the ice. Visit the library website at redbanklibrary.org for more information. It was then they realized the tours could be a regular offering. In 2018, the library hosted six tours; three more are scheduled for this spring. To accommodate those who can’t make a Saturday tour or prefer to explore on their own, another library volunteer, Mary Ellen Mess, created a map of the tour sites that can be downloaded on the library website at redbanklibrary.org. Colmorgen, a veteran traveler who taught elementary school in Middletown for 37 years, considers the borough library her second home. It was here that she signed up for first library card and here also that she spent one summer trying to read her way through all the biographies in the children’s room. Her family’s roots in Red Bank span generations. The daughter of milkman Carl Colmorgen and his wife Catherine, a nurse, Colmorgen lives today in the same Oakland Street house her parents settled in when she was a year old. Her oldest brother Carl returned to Red Bank after 35 years in Florida and is now known for the humorous hats he dons for his job as a crossing guard. Her brother Rob is retired from the Red Bank Police Department.  RED BANK – Red Bank Public Library was about to celebrate its 80th anniversary in 2017 when Linda Hewitt, the library’s circulation supervisor, outreach and program coordinator, decided it might be fun to conduct a walking tour of the town as part of the celebration. The Eisner enterprise also brought workers to Red Bank from many places in the world. To accommodate the growing number of Italian immigrants who were working in his factory, Eisner also helped acquire the land for the construction of St. Anthony’s Roman Catholic Church.  “Anything we can’t verify, we don’t say,” Colmorgen stressed. Although she’s traveled the world, Red Bank still holds a special place in her heart. “It’s survived a lot of changes. Some good, some bad,” she said. “But it’s a place I’ll always come back to. It’s still home.” It was also a big success.  Their first task was to do their homework. Using the abundance of resources available in the library’s book and periodical collection and in the Local History Room, they made a list of the borough’s historic sites, tracking down the facts associated with each one.  Colmorgen then compiled a notebook containing photographs, illustrations and background information on each site featured on the tour. There was plenty of fact-checking involved. At one time, someone suggested Theodore Roosevelt had worn an Army uniform from the Eisner factory. Colmorgen called Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay, New York, the home of the 26th president for more than 30 years, to check on it. It turned out Roosevelt had his uniform made at Brooks Brothers.  Spring 2018 Walking Tour. This year’s walks are scheduled for April 27, May 28 and June 22 . Photo courtesy Red Bank Librarycenter_img “We’re not going to say it if it isn’t correct,” added Colmorgen. This year the walks will take place April 27, May 28 and June 22. The tours are free, but donations are always welcome, and you do have to sign up in advance. “We try to limit the walk to 20 people to make sure everyone can hear and the sidewalks don’t get too crowded,” Hewitt said. She’d also be delighted if someone who reads this article has some volunteer time to give to the library. By Eileen Moon “She’s crazy for history,” Hewitt said.  Sigmund Eisner, an immigrant from an area then known as Bohemia (now part of the Czech Republic) began a manufacturing business in Red Bank at the turn of the previous century. Beginning with one sewing machine, Eisner built a thriving commercial empire that made uniforms for the U.S. Army and the Boy Scouts of America. The Galleria shopping center was the center of the Eisner manufacturing business for generations. To make it happen, Hewitt enlisted the help of retired teacher, lifelong borough resident and dedicated library volunteer Kathy Lou Colmorgen. In the spring of 2017, Hewitt and Colmorgen shared the fruits of all that research as they led the library’s 80th anniversary walking tours. “We did two of them the day we celebrated the 80th,” Hewitt recalled. “It was a collaborative effort.” The tours begin at the Red Bank Public Library and end at the Galleria shopping center on Bridge Avenue. “I call it the Eisner to Eisner tour,” said Colmorgen, who was named the library’s Volunteer of the Year in 2017. “We’re a library, so it has to be accurate,” Hewitt said with a smile.  “We have the perfect person,” Hewitt said. Her grandmother Karoline Dietz was a German immigrant whose family owned Dietz’s Market in downtown Red Bank, and all the male members of the family were volunteer firemen with the now-defunct Relief Engine Company. So when Hewitt asked for her help with the walking tour, there was no question she would say yes.last_img read more

4 Aug

Tradition Thrives at Monmouth County Hunt Club Opening Day

first_imgLike the men and women on horseback, the hounds are athletes who revel in the sport for its excitement and camaraderie and their love for the great outdoors. On Sunday, Nov. 10, members of the Monmouth County Hunt will celebrate opening day of their annual foxhunting season at the 5,700-acre Assunpink Wildlife Management Area in western Monmouth County. In past generations, foxhunts took place on estates of wealthy aficionados of the sport. But at this club, the sport is in the chase; foxes are not harmed. The welfare of the hounds is overseen by the nonprofit Monmouth Hound Welfare for life. “We do believe in cradle-to-grave care for our hounds,” said Jen Donaldson of Fair Haven, one of four joint masters of the Monmouth County Hunt. “You’re working to build a very cohesive group of hounds that can work together,” Valnoski said, and the members’ commitment to the animals is lifelong. “I have two here at my farm that are retired.” Irish immigrant Robert Collier, founder of the Collier’s publishing empire, is credited with establishing regular hunt meets on his property in Marlboro in 1885. “We bless the houndsand toast to a great year,”Donaldson said. Doug Raynor of Robbinsville, in red jacket leading a group of enthusiastic riders, is a joint master of the Monmouth County Hunt Club.Photo courtesy Meghan Valnoski/ Megval Studio As tradition dictates, it will be an impressive sight and the public is welcome to watch. Spectators called “car-followers” often come out to the event to listen for the hounds and horns and watch for the riders to appear as they follow the hunt. Today, members of the Monmouth County Hunt follow the hounds at Assunpink, a wildlife habitat in Allentown with three lakes and trails for hiking, mountain biking and cross-country skiing. There are about 40 canine members of the hunt club who are a mixture of three breeds of foxhounds, some of whom trace their bloodlines far back in time to the United Kingdom. Monmouth Hunt Club’s joint master Meg Valnoski from Allentown travels with hounds, along with professional staff Rebecca Brown.Photo courtesy Meghan Valnoski/ Megval Studio Donaldson and her fellow joint masters – Meghan Valnoski of Allentown, Doug Raynor of Robbinsville and Mary Jane Carey of Colts Neck – oversee the management and operations of the nonprofit club. “When you’re out thereyou feel like you’re in themiddle of a painting,” saidDonaldson, who began ridingas a “bucket list” item in herlate 30s. “It’s a very neat thingthat people in MonmouthCounty should be proud of.” Visit monmouthcountyhunt.com for more information on club membership and opening day events. The horses used in the foxhunt are frequently retired racehorses, but any horse that is comfortable with the demands of the sport is welcome. Members of the club also work with 4-H clubs to provide students with opportunities to ride. Although it’s called a fox-hunt, it’s more accurately a fox chase, Donaldson noted. “The fox is wild. It’s a wildlife management area.” On occasions like this coming Sunday, when members turn out in their formal attire, it’s a sight reminiscent of a scene from Downton Abbey. While people picture foxhunters in scarlet jackets, members of the Monmouth Hunt Club wear a variety of traditional attire, with staff members of the club wearing scarlet, women wearing blue or black coats and men wearing harrier green jackets, a fashion descended from the days of hare hunting in England. Dry weather can makeit difficult for the hounds topick up the scent of a fox.Some days the chase is afox-less pursuit. Like the horses and riders who follow them, the hounds enjoy the sport – particularly when the weather cooperates enough for them to pick up the scent of a fox and follow it to ground. “It’s really still a very vitalpart of the county,” Valnoskisaid. “We are trying to bringmore people into it. We’retrying to really make themaware of it and how muchfun they can have. It’s reallya wonderful way to get outand make new friends andjust enjoy the outdoors.” Another legendary local horseman, Amory Haskell, the first president of the Monmouth Park Jockey Club, reinvigorated the sport in 1932 with foxhunts held at the former Woodland Farm in Middletown, which was also the site of the annual steeplechase known as the Monmouth County Hunt, which ended in 1996. By Eileen Moon Members earn their colors and are awarded buttons bearing the symbol of the Monmouth County Hunt according to their years of participation and progress in the club. During the foxhuntingseason, which runs fromAugust to March, memberswill ride at Assunpink everyWednesday and Sunday. As they have done since 1885, club members will don their formal foxhunting attire and ride on horseback through the woods. “The goal of our sport isto chase foxes. It isn’t killingthe fox,” Valnoski said. Valnoski has been a member of the Monmouth County Hunt Club since 1982. During those years she has served the club in many capacities, including as a member of the board of directors and as club president. In recent years, she has been in charge of the kennels and the breeding and training of the hounds. Sunday’s opening dayfestivities will include ablessing of the hounds by alocal clergy person prior tothe hunt and a celebratorybreakfast after. Fortunately, the activityis a goal in itself. Club members are hoping for optimal weather for this Sunday’s event, which will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Editor’s Note: The original date of this event was Sunday, Oct. 27. But due to predicted high winds, the event has not been rescheduled for Nov. 10. The story has been updated to reflect the date change. It’s a formal sport, with rules and traditions that govern everything from the buttons worn on jackets to the care of the hounds. “Riders are steeped in tradition,” said Donaldson. Though the hunt is canceled when the weather is foul and conditions are too slippery for a safe hunt, a misty rain or fresh snow is generally fine. “The hounds enjoy that. It’s like kids on the first day of snow.” last_img read more

4 Aug

Atlantic Highlands’ New Mayor to Focus on Open Space Preservation, Development

first_imgAt the borough’s annualreorganization day Jan. 1,Gluckstein was sworn in toa four-year term as mayor.Fellow Republican StevenBoracchia was sworn in tohis second three-year termon the council and BrianBoms was sworn in to hisfirst three-year term. This article was first published in the January 9 – 15, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. “I do see an influx of younger people coming into town,” she said. “We want to make sure that everyone has the opportunity to participate.” By Eileen Moon Gluckstein and Boms were administered their oaths of office by state Assemblywoman Serena DiMaso. Boracchia was sworn in by Atlantic Highlands Municipal GOP chair Jane Frotton. During her organization day remarks, Gluckstein praised the town for its tradition of neighborliness and pledged to work harmoniously with members of the governing body and community. She’s not a fan of live streaming meetings of the governing body due to security concerns. “It’s a safety issue,” she said. As mayor, Gluckstein isentitled to vote only whenthere is a tie. Gluckstein, Boracchia and Boms ran a campaign advocating for the preservation of open space and reining in overdevelopment in the 4.562-square-mile borough on the Shrewsbury River that is home to fewer than 5,000 residents. “These three individuals really, really worked hard to garner your vote and garner your respect,” DiMaso told the audience, many of whom rose to give the newly elected officials a round of applause. GOP officials in attendance included state Sen. Declan O’Scanlon, Assemblyman Gerard Scharfenberger and Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden. Another issue that the mayor views as critical as the borough moves into the 2020s is enhancing communication technology and protocols in a way that makes government more accessible to younger residents who eschew traditional forms of communication. “I’m really excited to bemayor of a town that I love,”said Gluckstein. “It’s goingto be a great year.”center_img “That’s another issue that’shot for us,” Gluckstein said. “We have a vibrant business district, a beautiful harbor and first responders that give so much of their time and talents but most importantly we have each other. That means just like in any family you may disagree, at times even vehemently, but in the end you must be kind and respectful for we have more in common than not. So, we must draw on our commonalities as we surge into another decade. “Atlantic Highlands is not just a borough or a neighborhood, it’s my family. And I‘m pretty sure that the majority of people in this room would agree with me. Of particular concern to voters in the last election was a development plan for the 7-acre waterfront property known as the McConnell tract which calls for construction of 16 luxury town homes estimated to cost a million dollars each. Residents have also expressed concern about the fate of the now-vacant Mother Teresa Regional School and St. Agnes Thrift Shop which occupy 3.7 acres surrounded by residential property off Avenue D. With the newly installed officials, the composition of the borough council has changed from a Democratic majority to three Democrats and three Republicans. Boracchia and Boms will serve with fellow council members Jon Crowley, Lori Hohenleitner and Roy Dellosso, all Democrats, and Republican Councilman Jim Murphy. Boracchia will serve as council president. “Lastly I want everyone to know that I recognize that I am a public servant. I will always work as hard as possible for the people of Atlantic Highlands. I will always tell the truth even if it is not the answer you might be looking for and I will respect your opinions as I would hope you respect mine.” “McConnell and Mother Teresa, those are the things that are hot items on the agenda,” Gluckstein told The Two River Times. “We’re looking into it with the open space committee.” She’s planning on establishing a mayor’s Facebook page and offering videotaped council meetings online. ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – 2020 is off to a promising start for the borough’s new mayor, Loretta Gluckstein, a 30-year resident of the borough who previously served as president of the Henry Hudson Regional Board of Education. Gluckstein takes office at a time when the borough is experiencing a surge of business and residential interest, bringing complaints about lack of parking. last_img read more

3 Aug

Saints take to road looking for points against UVIC

first_img“They play with a lot of pride and now with a couple weeks off they’re going to be healthy and ready to go. These are going to be much tough games than a quick look at the standings would indicate.”The Saints will look to build off momentum gained in a lopsided 9-5 victory over the previously-unbeaten Clan when they take on a UVic squad that is still searching for their first win of the 2013/14 season. The Vikes currently sit in sixth place in the BCIHL standings with a 0-10 record. They’ve been coming closer and closer to breaking into the win column, however, as their most recent outings were a pair of one-goal losses on the road to TRU and SFU. Selkirk has had its fair share of success against the Vikes, including eight straight victories dating back to the team’s 2012/13 season opener. But only two of those wins have come in the uncomfortable confines of the Ian Stewart Complex, which houses the BCIHL’s smallest ice surface. “There isn’t a lot of time or space to make plays in their rink, so if you go into those games without a sense of urgency you’re not going to get a good result,” says Dubois.”Last season we put up some strong numbers on the road, but both games at UVic were one-goal margins and one of those was in overtime.” The Vikes’ primary trouble to date has been in the goal scoring department, as the squad has scored just 13 times in 10 games.But their roster does include a number of experienced BCIHL veterans, including 2012/13 league goals leader Shawn Mueller and a handful of proven point-per-game forwards in Eli Wiebe, Adam Klein and Evan Warner. Selkirk, meanwhile, has been hitting the back of the net with regularity in recent weeks, as the Saints lead all BCIHL teams with 59 goals.Cody Fidgett is coming off a five-point outing on Saturday against SFU and sits second in league scoring with 20 points, while linemate Logan Proulx sits just one point back and leads all BCIHL skaters in assists with 14.Not far behind are Connor McLaughlin, with 18 points, as well as Thomas Hardy (15), Jackson Garrett (14) and Darnell Dyck (13). Following this weekend in Victoria, the Saints will return home for their final game of 2013 against Eastern Washington University on Friday, November 29th. On the heels of a huge home ice win over Simon Fraser University on Saturday night, the Selkirk College Men’s Hockey program will travel to Vancouver Island this weekend for a pair of B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League games against the University of Victoria at the Ian Stewart Complex.Both games are being streamed on live FastHockey.com. Friday at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday at 12:30 p.m.”UVic is an honest, hard-working team that’s had some struggles early in the season, but their record to date isn’t a proper reflection of their talent level or competitiveness,” says Saints head coach Jeff Dubois.last_img read more

3 Aug

Nelson’s Bruce A. Sinclair takes pitch for Bermuda

first_imgL.V. Rogers grad Bruce A. Sinclair is heading back to the 2014 World Field Lacrosse Championships beginning Thursday (July 10) in Denver, Col., at a member of the Bermuda National Team.Sinclair, 41, graduated from LVR in 1991 before earning a degree from University of Victoria in 1996 and gaining a Masters of Science at Montana State University in Bozeman, Mont.Sinclair has spent the past 12 years as a Science and Math Teacher and head of data management at Saltus Grammar School in Hamilton, Bermuda, which is the capital of the country located in the Atlantic Ocean off the east coast of the United States.”I became interested in the sport due to its fast paced nature and team spirit,” Sinclair told The Nelson Daily on the eve of the national tournament.”I took up lacrosse six years ago and was able to represent Bermuda in the 2010 World Championships in Manchester England.”In that tournament we placed 18 out of 29 teams . . . won 3 games posting victories over Denmark, Latvia and Norway,” he added.Sinclair plays defensive midfielder or D-Middy as coaches prefer to call the position. Sinclair said Bermuda used to have a much higher population of ex-patriot workers, which included several lacrosse players. The interest in the sport allowed followers to enjoy at least a couple of tournaments a year.However, since the recession, the field lacrosse population has dwindled and the bulk of the competition is now reserved for weekly indoor games with the bulk of the Bermuda National side coming from players who are Bermudian or have a Bermuda connection but are working off island.Bermuda is playing in the Yellow Division against France, Ireland and Uganda in the 38 nation tournament.The tournament opens with the opening ceremony Thursday followed by the host United States team battling Canada. The field is broken into nine divisions, with the top six teams competing in the Blue Division.The other eight divisions all have four teams and are not grouped by world ranking.”We have a solid core of returning players heading to Denver,” Sinclair explains.”Having not seen these countries we play in our pool recently we are unsure of our chances,” he added.”We hope that we will come away from the pool play with at least one victory. Ireland proved to be strong in England, so we will be looking to be competitive against France and Uganda.”Sinclair, who played all sports at LVR and has a five-year-old boy named Ciaran, has represented Bermuda at the National level in volleyball team from 2004-2007 and again as assistant coach in 2013.The World Field Lacrosse Championships conclude (Saturday) July 19 with the Championship game.The U.S. beat Canada, 12-10, in the 2010 world championship in Manchester, England.last_img read more

3 Aug

Kootenay Lake Fishing Report — Stick to shorelines

first_img  What are they biting on???The Rainbows on Kootenay Lake are keying in on the small fry that have entered the lake, so our best presentation has been 4″ bucktails.  Fished close to shore and right on the surface.  The color patterns haven’t changed much.  The usual black & white, grey & white, and green & white have been working well.  The standard numbers lately have been:  210, 228, 234.  Other small lures have been working as well.  Small spoons and small rapallas have been catching a few lately as well.On the river, we have been catching our Walleye on the usual three-way rig on the bottom with a worm.  Also working well are our weighted jigs with rubber twisters or tipped with a worm.  The Rainbows for us  have been mostly caught on flies.  Try swinging a nymph during the dead heat of the day, and then switch to the dry caddis when the fish begin to rise.  It’s getting better every day.Hope this helpsSo, if you’re looking to go fishing, we have lots of options at this time of year.
Tight lines………………….Kerry Reed Reel Adventures Sportfishing Nelson B.C June is in the books, but Kerry Reed from Reel Adventures has all the tips and news for July in the Kootenay Lake Fishing Report.It is now July and we are excited to announce that we have placed our boats in all of our favourite fishing locations.  We now have our two boats on Kootenay Lake, as well as one boat on the Columbia River, and just recently placed our other boat on the westcoast of Vancouver Island out of Ucluelet.  So, we have plenty of options for everybody throughout the summer months.’We would also like to welcome our newest member to the team.  Expert flyfisher and instructor, Captain Ken is available throughout the summer to help you with your flyfishing techniques and put you into some great fishing days on the Columbia.  Welcome aboard Ken!And now, here’s the latest fishing report:Kootenay Lake:With the latest heatwave upon us, the fishing has been hit and miss. Although there are lots of two to three-pound Rainbows still coming in regularly, with the odd 10 – 15 pound fish being caught lately.In the past couple weeks we have noticed a lot of fry entering the lake and this is what the fish are keying on.  So, keep your presentation small and stick to the shorelines and you will catch fish.One of our latest trips had four lovely ladies join us for the day.  The day started out calm and a few nice fish were caught.  And then, as it has happened a lot lately, the weather changed in an instance.  We went from flat, calm water to three-to-four-foot waves and crazy wind gusts.  I asked the women if they felt uncomfortable and would like to return to the dock.  They replied, “not a chance, this is our day to be on the water”.  So, we decided to stick it out for the day.It proved to be worthwhile as we continued to catch fish all day long. Even though the captain was ready to head in, the ladies were happy to keep fishing.  At the end of the day, they ended up with 10 nice Rainbows to share between the four of them.  Always nice to head home with some great feast for the BBQ.As the day was coming to an end, we notice the blackest clouds moving in and we could see huge whitecaps coming from the north.  It was time to call it a day.  As quick as we could get the lines in, the wind and waves were upon us.   Five foot waves and 40km winds made for an exciting ride back.  More like a ride at the amusement park.  We made it back to the dock with a sigh of relief from the captain.  Just another adventure.  But still a great day. It looks like theres still a lot of fish to be caught throughout the summer, and they seem to be hungry.  So, stay tuned……..  Columbia River:The river seems to be at its highest level lately.  And while that doesn’t usually provide the best fishing when it is rising, it seems to have stabilized over the past week or two, and the fish are getting into a feeding pattern.  Our last few trips have seen 10 – 20 Rainbows come to the boat.  And our favourite time has just arrived.  The caddis hatch!  That means that these fish are now looking up.  They are keying on insects on the surface, which means its dry fly season.  The most exciting time to catch these feisty Rainbows.One small pool we drifted into was holding a couple dozen fish.  We could sit and watch these fish cycle from the top end of the pool to the bottom end.  Each taking turns coming to the surface to sip a skittering caddis.  This made for an exciting afternoon.  Sight fishing for these great fish is very exciting.  And getting your presentation just right is rewarding.  When that fish finally comes to the surface to take your offering.  Zing……………..goes the reel and into the air goes the fish.  These fish are powerful.  Being raised in the strong currents of the Columbia makes for some strong swimming fish.  And these fish will take you well into your backing before you can gain control.  Just another exciting afternoon on the Columbia.That’s only the fly fishing part of it.  We have also been hooking into some nice Walleye on the spinning gear.  They’re not really thick in the river yet, but that will soon change.  The next couple of months should see more and more Walleye hanging around and the fishing will just get better and better.  Most of the Walleye have been two to four pounds.  And most of our Rainbows have been 16 – 22 inches, with the odd 24 -27 inch fish as well. Were just getting into the prime river fishing.  So stay tuned for that as well. The Salmon fishing is in full swing.  And there seems to be lots of bait around this year, which has been bringing lots of big fish in with it.  This is the beginning of our 2 month Salmon season, so we are looking forward to the fish getting even bigger and more abundant as July and August approach.  Already consistent Salmon in the 20 plus pound range, with a few 30 pounders coming in lately.  Looking forward to the rest of the season.last_img read more

3 Aug

Cotter rink rolls into Page Playoff at 2016 Canadian Direct Insurance BC Men’s Curling Championships

first_imgEarlier in the day, Geall thrashed another Kootenay rink, Chris Ducharme of Creston 9-3 in seven ends.Geall now meets Johnson Friday morning in B event play.The winner plays in the B Final Friday at 2 p.m. against the survivor of the Glen Jackson/Jeff Richard contest and the two seed in the Page Playoff.Richard doubled Wes Craig of Victoria 6-3 Thursday evening while Jackson edged out Daniel Wenzek 6-4.Kootenay rinks Ducharme and Buchy now must look to qualify in the C event today.Ducharme, fresh from knocking out Will House of Richmond 7-4 Thursday night — the rink’s second win of the day — now waits for the winner of Wenzek and Jason Montgomery of Victoria.Buchy meets Neil Dangerfield of Victoria today at 9 a.m.The Page Playoffs begin Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. with Cotter facing the B-event winner.At 7 p.m. the final two qualifiers face off in the 3-4 contest for the right to meet the loser of the 1-2 Page Playoff Sunday morning at 11 a.m.The 2016 Canadian Direct Insurance BC Men’s Curling Final, matching the 1-2 Page Playoff winner against the semi final victor, is set for 4 p.m. at the Nelson Curling Rink.Both games Sunday will be televised live by Sportsnet.The overall winner of the event will represent B.C. at the Tim Hortons Brier in Ottawa March 5-13. Earlier in the week, Jim Cotter expressed that the goal of every team at the 2016 Canadian Direct Insurance BC Men’s Curling Championships was to “make the playoffs.”Cotter grabbed the top spot in the Page Playoff Thursday night, holding off Michael Johnson of New Westminster 5-4 in the A-Final at the Nelson Curling Club.The defending BC Men’s Champ took control of the game from the opening end, scoring the deuce in the first end.Cotter, third Ryan Kuhn, second Tyrel Griffiths and lead Rick Sawatsky, then took a commanding 4-1 lead after three ends with another pair in the end en route to the top prize in the triple-knockout elimination round.The Okanagan rink out curled their opponents during the contest 89 percent to 78 for Johnson, with Ryan Kuhn having a stellar game at the third position, finishing at 93 percent.Johnson came into the contest on a roll, with victories over pre-playdow favourite Dean Joanisse Wednesday 6-3 and Wes Craig 6-4 earlier Thursday.In other action Thursday, the next rink looking to book a spot in the Page Playoffs appears to be the Sean Geall rink of New Westminster.After arriving earlier in the day from Vancouver due to the birth of his child, Geall cruised to another dominating victory, this time a 10-3 pasting of Kimberley’s Tom Buchy in B-event action.Geall, third Andrew Bilesky, Steve Kopf and lead Mark Olsen broke open a close game by scoring eight points from ends three to six — including a fiver in the sixth.last_img read more